Josh Hamilton had a nightmare game last night


It’s hard to grasp how truly awful Josh Hamilton was on Tuesday night. He came to the plate five times. Here’s what happened:

  • First Inning: No score, Mike Trout on first, nobody out, Hamilton grounds into a double play;
  • Third Inning: Mariners up 2-1, Mike Trout on first, nobody out, Hamilton grounds into a double play;
  • Fifth Inning: Mariners up 2-1, Peter Bourjos on second, Mike Trout on first, one out, Hamilton grounds into a double play;
  • Seventh Inning: Mariners up 2-1, Chirs Ianetta on second, two outs, Hamilton strikes out;
  • Ninth Inning: Score tied 2-2, Erik Aybar on second, Chris Ianetta on first, two out, Hamilton strikes out.

Those were a lot of chances to tie the game, give the Angels the lead or, at the very least, keep an inning going and let someone else help out. Instead he left seven men on base, Anaheim lost in extra innings and Hamilton experienced perhaps his worst night in an Angels uniform.

For those of you who want a statistical measure of this badness, note that Hamilton’s Win Probability Added (WPA), which measures how much a player contributed to his team’s win or loss on a given day, was -.477. That means he, all by his lonesome, reduced the Angels’ chances of winning last night’s game by 47.7%.

On the bright side: only four more years to go on that contract after this one.

Chris Sale will start on Opening Day for Red Sox

Bob Levey/Getty Images

No surprise here: Chris Sale will start on Opening Day for the Red Sox, Pete Abraham of The Boston Globe reports. The Red Sox open the season on March 29 in Tampa Bay against the Rays. Sale will oppose Chris Archer.

Sale, 28, is the fifth different Opening Day starter the Red Sox have had in as many years, preceded by Rick Porcello, David Price, Clay Buchholz, and Jon Lester. Sale started on Opening Day for the White Sox in 2013, ’14, and ’16.

Sale finished second in AL Cy Young Award balloting last year and finished ninth for AL MVP. He went 17-8 with a 2.90 ERA and a 308/43 K/BB ratio in 214 1/3 innings. Sale and Clayton Kershaw (2015) are the only pitchers to strike out 300 or more batters in a season dating back to 2003.