San Jose sues Major League Baseball, challenging its monopoly power

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The City of San Jose has sued Major League Baseball in an effort to get the Oakland A’s to relocate to San Jose, to challenge the Giants claim to rights over the territory and to challenge Major League Baseball’s long-standing monopoly power.

The lawsuit, a copy of which can be seen here, and which is analyzed in-depth here, alleges that Major League Baseball has caused San Jose to lose prospective financial benefits and deals by virtue of the A’s moving there and violations of state and federal antitrust laws.

This will get big headlines, but until I see the lawsuit or have someone tell me otherwise, I can’t see how the City of San Jose would have a leg to stand on. Literally: I think legal standing is a big, big problem here.

Standing, for purposes of a lawsuit, is the idea that focuses on whether a plaintiff in a lawsuit can show that he or she some personal legal interest that has been damaged by the defendant. It is not enough that the plaintiff has an interest of sorts or a prospective interest. It has to be a concrete personal stake in the outcome of the suit. You may be very interested in a big real estate deal going down, but you can’t sue the people involved for not letting you into the deal on the idea that, “man, I would’ve made a ton of money!”  You have to be in the deal already and have your rights violated.

I don’t see how San Jose has that standing here. Yes, they would benefit greatly from the A’s moving to San Jose and yes MLB’s monopoly rules which control where franchises can and cannot be are preventing it. But they are not party to those rules. They have no hard and fast deal with the Oakland A’s yet. There have been statements of principles and plans announced pending MLB approval of an A’s move, but nothing hard and in stone. Indeed, if the A’s had committed to San Jose in such a way already, the Giants and/or Major League Baseball likely would have sued them by now.

I hate baseball’s monopoly power. I think it makes watching games on TV difficult and I think it makes the game less competitive by keeping teams from doing everything they can to compete. But that doesn’t give me the right to sue Major League Baseball over it. The A’s in San Jose would make San Jose’s life way better too, many would argue. But just because they’re not doesn’t give San Jose the right to sue either. What would make this different is if Lew Wolff and the A’s were involved. And I find it almost impossible to believe that they would be.

UPDATE: How about more than impossible the A’s would be involved here. From Michael McCann’s column about Frank McCourt back in 2011 in Sports Illustrated:

MLB could also highlight the “waiver of recourse” clause found in the MLB constitution. This clause prevents clubs from engaging in litigation against the commissioner, the league or other owners. Indeed, by virtue of becoming a franchise owner, an owner waives away the right to seek remedies that would normally be available through the legal system. The clause also compels owners to resolve their differences internally and to accept the commissioner’s judgment as binding.

This would prevent the A’s from joining in.  I’m told the San Jose complaint, however, alleges that the MLB Constitution is expired now. Which would be odd, but that’s the claim. Likely asserted so that the A’s could later join the suit if it gets further down the road.

Yadier Molina will not enter contract negotiations during the 2017 season

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Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Cardinals’ catcher Yadier Molina is still open to extension talks during the last week of spring training. Once Opening Day rolls around, however, Molina has preemptively nixed any contract negotiations until the end of the 2017 season, when he’s scheduled to hit free agency.

Molina wants to stay with the Cardinals, or so he’s telling reporters, but he’s also “not afraid” to test the free agent market this fall should a deal fail to materialize. Via Goold:

I would love to stay, but at the same time I’m not afraid to go to free agency. I’ve still got many years in the tank. Believe me. I feel great. I feel like a 20-year-old kid. I’m not afraid to go to free agency.

The 34-year-old backstop is entering his final year under contract, though Goold points out that he has a $15 million option for 2018 that he can choose to decline in the event that it’s exercised by the team. He’s reportedly searching for a figure closer to those made by other top catchers like Buster Posey and Russell Martin.

The 2017 season will mark Molina’s 14th year in the Cardinals’ organization, building on a career that has spanned seven All-Star campaigns, nine postseason runs and two World Series championships in St. Louis. He batted .307/.360/.427 with eight home runs and a .787 OPS for the club in 2016.

Colby Rasmus could start 2017 on the disabled list

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Colby Rasmus isn’t ready to take outfield reps just yet. According to Rays’ manager Kevin Cash, that’s a red flag, one that could potentially postpone Rasmus’ debut as the club’s designated hitter and outfielder in 2017. Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports that Rasmus will need to prove he can play a defensive position before getting cleared for the active roster, something which the veteran outfielder has yet to do this spring.

Rasmus, 30, signed a one-year, $5 million deal with the Rays following his two-year run with the Astros. He batted a meager .206/.286/.355 with 15 home runs and a .641 OPS in 2016 and was shut down in late September with an unspecified hip/groin issue. Entering the 2017 season, he’s expected to work his way back to a full-time role after undergoing surgery to repair his core muscle and left hip labrum last October.

The Rays also finalized their one-year, $1.2 million deal with catcher Derek Norris on Saturday and will need to clear room for him on the 40-man roster. Topkin speculates that the move could send Rasmus to the 60-day disabled list, though the outfielder is not projected to miss more than a couple weeks of the regular season.