Donovan Tate, a spring training no-show, has finally returned to the Padres organization

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Donovan Tate, the third overall pick in the 2009 MLB Amateur Draft, was a no-show this spring at Padres camp due to what was described by club officials as a personal matter. Now more than four months later, that personal matter has apparently been resolved.

Corey Brock of MLB.com reports that Tate finally arrived at the Padres’ spring training complex in Peoria, Arizona on Monday to begin working his way back into baseball shape. He spoke with reporters Tuesday: “I left baseball in order to gain a grasp on some personal issues in my life,” said Tate. “It’s been the same kind of things that I’ve been dealing with in my life for a long time. I’ve been very blessed to be part of the Padres. They’ve been very supportive of everything I’ve gone through and haven’t given up on me.”

Tate, who received a $6.25 million signing bonus soon after being drafted, was suspended 50 games in June 2011 following a second positive test for a drug of abuse (not a performance-enhancer). The athletic outfielder is a .241/.358/.320 career hitter in the minor leagues and will turn 23 years old in September.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.