Bruce Bochy screwed up a double switch in last night’s game

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Bruce Bochy is in his 19th season as a National League manager. He’s forgotten more about double switches than you and I will ever know. If a national emergency happened and the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff needed an expert in double switching to stave off the apocalypse, Bochy would probably be, like, the third guy they’d call (La Russa would be first but would be discovered as the evil genius causing the apocalypse; Bobby Cox would probably be fishing).

But even experts screw up sometimes. Like Bochy did during the top of the 13th in last night’s Padres-Giants game:

“I messed up the double switch,” the Giants’ manager said after the Giants lost 5-3 to the Padres in 13 innings. “I got distracted. I was out there arguing, and I totally brain-cramped on that.”

What happened was this: Bochy made a pitching change, putting in Jake Dunning for Jose Mijares. OK. As part of that change he put Posey in the game at first base (Posey had had the night off to that point) and put him in for Brandon Belt in the seven slot in the lineup. Problem:  Bochy really wanted Posey to hit in the nine slot for Guillermo Quiroz, who would be leading off the botton of the 13th.

As a result of double switching in Posey, rather than simply having him pinch hit for Quiroz, he ensured that Posey would never bat in the game. Quiroz led off the inning, grounded out and three batters later the game was over.

There’s obviously no guarantee that Posey would have done anything had he batted, but we’ll never know.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.