Wolff on the Coliseum: “It’s all a bunch of crap … it stinks.”

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OK, admittedly the elipses covers a TON of ground here. So much so that I’m clearly and juvenilely trying to make poop jokes out of this Oakland Coliseum thing. But A’s owner Lew Wolff did say those things to Bob Nightengale of USA Today.

Less juvenilely, Nightengale’s article is interesting beyond potty humor. Specifically, in it Wolff outlines past sewage incidents at the Coliseum, one as recently as this past Wednesday in a stadium restaurant. Nightengale also notes that, contrary to my and others constantly saying that Bud Selig’s blue ribbon committee on Oakland is still working, it did release something recently:

Major League Baseball, which hoped the A’s and Giants would somehow reach an agreement on their own, finally got a resolution from their blue ribbon committee. The committee submitted a set of guidelines to Wolff in February, and if he agreed to meet the requirements, a move could soon be underway.

Wolff won’t talk about the guidelines. Neither will the Giants. Or even Major League Baseball.

As Nightengale notes, the guidelines, whatever they are, clearly aren’t realistic and/or appealing or else something would have happened by now.

But it is worth noting for accuracy’s sake that the committee’s work is done and Major League Baseball’s failure to do anything about the A’s awful situation has entered a new and different era.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.