Less than a year after signing big extension, Cole Hamels leads NL in losses

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Despite pitching well throughout most of today’s game against the Rockies, Phillies starter Cole Hamels was once again saddled with a loss, his tenth of the season. Aside from a solo home run by Wilin Rosario in the second, Hamels stayed out of trouble in six innings. In the seventh, frustration with home plate umpire Marvin Hudson’s inconsistent strike zone and his offense’s Little League approach to hitting elicited a rare emotional outburst from the left-hander. The Rockies scored two more runs off of Hamels in the seventh, and another two off of Justin De Fratus in the eighth as they went on to win 5-2.

Hamels certainly started off the year pitching poorly, but he has come on as of late. Over his last six starts spanning 37.1 innings, Hamels has struck out 42, walked four, and allowed only three home runs. In those starts, he is 1-4 and has received a grand total of 17 runs of support. Only 12 of those runs were scored while Hamels was the pitcher of record.

The Phillies signed Hamels to a six-year, $144 million contract extension on July 25 last year, locking up the lefty through at least 2018, when he will be 34 years old.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.