Dodgers making progress on extension with Clayton Kershaw

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Ken Rosenthal reports that the Dodgers are making progress with starter Clayton Kershaw on a seven-year contract extension worth in excess of $180 million. The 25-year-old left-hander enters his third and final year of arbitration going into 2014 after which he would be eligible for free agency. That the Dodgers would eventually sign Kershaw to an extension seemed inevitable; the only question was the exact amount of cash involved.

Kershaw’s contract will be based in no small part on those signed recently by Tigers ace Justin Verlander (seven years, $180 million) and Mariners ace Felix Hernandez (seven years, $175 million).

Assuming the first year of the contract would be near the average annual value ($25-26 million), the Dodgers would owe $20 million or more to five players going into the 2014 season: Kershaw, Adrian Gonzalez, Carl Crawford, Matt Kemp, and Zack Greinke. Their 2014 payroll already stands at $163 million without factoring in the arbitration eligibility of Kershaw and potentially four other players.

Kershaw has a league-best 1.88 ERA on the season and led the NL in that category in each of the previous two seasons as well, winning the Cy Young in 2011 and finishing as the runner-up to R.A. Dickey last year.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.