MLB hands down the suspensions for Tuesday night’s Dodgers-Diamondbacks melee

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The discipline has been handed down for the Dodgers-Diamondbacks melee on Tuesday night. Twelve different people were disciplined with eight being handed suspensions. The breakdown:

  • Ian Kennedy gets a ten-game suspension;
  • Eric Hinske gets a five-game suspension;
  • J.P. Howell and Skip Schumaker each get two-game suspensions;
  • Ronald Belisario gets a one-game suspension;
  • Dodgers coach Mark McGwire was suspended two games;
  • Dodgers manager Don Mattingly and Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson were each suspended for one;
  • Fines in undisclosed amounts were handed out to Zack Greinke, Yasiel Puig, Miguel Montero and Gerardo Parra;
  • The Dodgers were fined as a team for allowing players on the disabled list — Josh Beckett and Chris Capuano — to go out onto the field during the fight. How they, as a team, were supposed to stop them when their managers and coaches were all out there fighting too I have no idea.

Kinda surprising that Greinke didn’t get any time off for clearly throwing at Miguel Montero, but I suppose the powers that be figure him being plunked was enough.

As for the others: We live in a world where throwing a fastball at someone’s head makes you miss one start, in all likelihood. Two at most. We also live in aw world where the managers who preside over the beanball wars get a slap on the wrist. That doesn’t seem right to me. Managers set the tone for their team and players feel obligated to engage in these battles lest they fall out of favor with their managers. The penalties should be greater.

The managers and coaches will begin serving their suspensions immediately. Players have a right to appeal. If they do, they will not be suspended until the appeal is heard.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.