Trammell Mattingly

MLB hands down the suspensions for Tuesday night’s Dodgers-Diamondbacks melee

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The discipline has been handed down for the Dodgers-Diamondbacks melee on Tuesday night. Twelve different people were disciplined with eight being handed suspensions. The breakdown:

  • Ian Kennedy gets a ten-game suspension;
  • Eric Hinske gets a five-game suspension;
  • J.P. Howell and Skip Schumaker each get two-game suspensions;
  • Ronald Belisario gets a one-game suspension;
  • Dodgers coach Mark McGwire was suspended two games;
  • Dodgers manager Don Mattingly and Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson were each suspended for one;
  • Fines in undisclosed amounts were handed out to Zack Greinke, Yasiel Puig, Miguel Montero and Gerardo Parra;
  • The Dodgers were fined as a team for allowing players on the disabled list — Josh Beckett and Chris Capuano — to go out onto the field during the fight. How they, as a team, were supposed to stop them when their managers and coaches were all out there fighting too I have no idea.

Kinda surprising that Greinke didn’t get any time off for clearly throwing at Miguel Montero, but I suppose the powers that be figure him being plunked was enough.

As for the others: We live in a world where throwing a fastball at someone’s head makes you miss one start, in all likelihood. Two at most. We also live in aw world where the managers who preside over the beanball wars get a slap on the wrist. That doesn’t seem right to me. Managers set the tone for their team and players feel obligated to engage in these battles lest they fall out of favor with their managers. The penalties should be greater.

The managers and coaches will begin serving their suspensions immediately. Players have a right to appeal. If they do, they will not be suspended until the appeal is heard.

Nationals will add Mat Latos to the roster on Thursday

ARLINGTON, TX - MAY 11:  Mat Latos #38 of the Chicago White Sox pitches against the Texas Rangers in the bottom of the first inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on May 11, 2016 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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Thursday is September 1, which means rosters expand. As a result, the Nationals plan to promote pitcher Mat Latos to the major league roster, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports. Latos had an opt-out clause for Monday, but after discussing the matter with the team, he agreed to stay at Triple-A Syracuse until Thursday.

Latos, 28, put up a 4.62 ERA over 11 starts with the White Sox before being released in mid-June. Nearly two weeks later, he signed a minor league contract with the Nationals.

In the Nationals’ minor league system, Latos has made three starts for the club’s Gulf Coast League team as well as three for Syracuse. In aggregate, the right-hander has yielded six runs (four earned) on 20 hits and 10 walks with 28 strikeouts in 28 innings.

Latos will likely pitch out of a long relief role for the Nationals and can be used as starting rotation insurance as well.

John Gibbons texts Mark Buehrle, “You know, rosters expand in September.”

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - OCTOBER 2:  Mark Buehrle #56 of the Toronto Blue Jays pitches during the second inning of a game against the Tampa Bay Rays on October 2, 2015 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida.  (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Mark Buehrle hasn’t officially retired, but he hasn’t thrown a pitch in professional baseball since last October. Still, the Blue Jays wouldn’t mind having some insurance, so manager John Gibbons recently texted Buehrle, “You know, rosters expand in September,” Sportsnet’s Ben Nicholson-Smith reports.

Buehrle’s response? He texted back a picture of a lake. Sounds like he’s not interested in making a return, at least this year.

Last year, at the age of 36, Buehrle went 15-8 with a 3.81 ERA with a 91/33 K/BB ratio in 198 2/3 innings while leading the league with four complete games. He fell 1 1/3 innings shy of a 15th consecutive 200-inning season. There are many worse ways to end a career.