And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

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Athletics 3, Yankees 2: Looking at the Yankees side of the box score and noting Robinson Cano’s contributions compared to everyone else’s and this comes to mind. Mark Teixeira, Travis Hafner, Kevin Youkilis and Vernon Wells combined to go 0 for 28 with 12 strikeouts in this marathon game. And while, yes, hats off to the A’s staff for 17 consecutive scoreless innings, fact is that the Yankees offense has been absolutely terrible of late. 19th in runs scored, 23rd in batting average, 22nd in on base percentage and 21st in slugging percentage in all of baseball.

Cardinals 2, Mets 1: It’s a shame, really, that Matt Harvey just doesn’t know how to win. Perhaps he can ask Adam Wainwright how he gets his team to score some runs for him.

Orioles 5, Red Sox 4: It’s not often that a 13 inning game is the third longest of the day, but that’s yesterday for you. The Orioles won despite leaving 16 runners on base and going 4 for 14 with runners in scoring position. Thirteen pitchers used between the two clubs in the first of a four-game series. So this one should be fun to watch this weekend.

Cubs 6, Reds 5: This one went 14, and the Cubs finally broke the Reds Wrigley Field winning streak. The Cubs bullpen racked up 13 strikeouts over eight scoreless innings.

Royals 10, Rays 1: Elliott Johnson hit a three-run homer and was 3 for 4 overall against his old club. Ervin Santana allowed but an unearned run in seven and two-thirds. Jeremy Hellickson? Five and two-thirds, ten hits, eight runs. More like Jeremy Shellackison, amirite?

Nationals 5, Rockies 4:  Troy Tulowitzki, Carlos Gonzalez and Dexter Fowler drive the Rockies. Troy Tulowitzki, Carlos Gonzalez and Dexter Fowler each left yesterday’s game with injuries. So, yeah. Tulowitzki is going to miss 4-6 weeks. This could be the end of the frisky portion of the Rockies’ season. Meanwhile, Ryan Zimmerman homered, doubled and drove in three runs, Desmond got four hits.

Blue Jays 3, Rangers 1: Yu Darvish and Esmil Rogers each allowed one run in seven innings. Edwin Encarnacion’s two-run double in the eighth broke the tie.

Giants 10, Pirates 0: Matt Cain: much better these days. He tossed six and two-thirds scoreless innings and wasn’t wanting for run support. Hunter Pence drove in three and is hitting .296/.341/.518 on the year.

Phillies 3, Twins 2: Ben Revere went 4 for 6 and Cliff Lee did nothing to stop the “oh man someone should trade for him at the deadline” stuff, allowing two runs in seven innings.

The Marlins are “willing to engage” on trade talks for Giancarlo Stanton

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Jon Morosi hears that the Marlins are “willing to engage with other teams” on a possible Giancarlo Stanton trade.

As we noted yesterday, Stanton has cleared revocable waivers, so he’s eligible to be dealt to any club. The price for Stanton is likely to be high given that he’s enjoying a career year, batting .285/.376/.646 with a league-leading 44 home runs and 94 RBI in 116 games this season. He’s also, obviously, the cornerstone of the franchise.

You also have to assume that anyone looking to acquire Stanton would want the Marlins to chip in money on his $285 million contract. If not, someone might’ve simply claimed him on waivers with the hope that the Marlins would simply let him walk, right? Which suggests that any negotiation over Stanton would be a long and difficult one. It might also involve Stanton agreeing to restructure his deal, which currently gives him an opt-out after the 2020 season. That would likely involve the MLBPA as well, which just makes it all the more complicated.

I think it’s a long shot that the Marlins would trade Stanton in-season, but it’s not hard to imagine him being traded this winter.

Jered Weaver announces his retirement

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Jered Weaver, a 12-year big league veteran and a three-time All-Star, has announced his retirement.

Weaver was struggling mightily with the Padres this year, going 0-5 in nine starts and posting a 7.44 ERA,, a 2.6 BB/9 and 4.9 K/9 ratio over 42.1 innings. He hadn’t posted a sub-4.00 ERA since 2014 and his velocity had, quite famously, sunk into the low 80s and even high 70s at times in recent seasons. A spate of physical setbacks contributed to that, with a hip inflammation ailing him this season and nerve issues in his neck and back afflicting him for the past few years.

But even if his recent seasons have been less-than-memorable, it’s worth remembering that he was, for a time, one of baseball’s best pitchers. He posted a record of 131-69 with a 3.28 ERA in his first 9 seasons, leading the American League in strikeouts in 2010 and leading the circuit in wins in 2012 and 2014. He likewise led the league in WHIP and hits allowed per nine innings in 2012.

He finishes his career with a record of 150-98, an ERA of 3.63 (ERA+ of 111) and a K/BB ratio of 1,621/551 in 2,067.1 innings. He pitched in four American League Division Series and the 2009 ALCS, posting a 2.67 ERA in seven playoff games pitched.

Happy trails, Jered. A first-ballot induction into the Hall of He Was Really Dang Good, Even if We Forgot About It For A While is in your future.