Troy Tulowitzki out 4-6 weeks with broken rib

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UPDATE: Thomas Harding of MLB.com reports that Tulowitzki is expected to miss 4-6 weeks. The Rockies will likely recall Josh Rutledge to replace him on the active roster, but it’s going to tough to hang around in the playoff race without him.

9:39 PM: Terrible news for the Rockies. Troy Renck of the Denver Post was told by major league sources that Tulowitzki was diagnosed with a broken rib on his right side following an MRI. He’s expected to face a lengthy absence.

9:33 PM: The Rockies have been one of baseball’s biggest surprises this season in part because Troy Tulowitzki and Carlos Gonzalez have been healthy and extremely productive, but today wasn’t very kind to them.

Tulowitzki injured his ribs on a diving stop in the eighth inning of this afternoon’s game against the Nationals. Rockies manager Walt Weiss told Troy Renck of the Denver Post that he’s actually been dealing with soreness in the area for about a week. He’ll undergo an MRI to determine the severity of the injury, but he could obviously miss an extended period of time if it turns out to be one of those nasty strained oblique muscles.

Gonzalez and Dexter Fowler also left today’s game due to injury, but both are considered day-to-day for now. In a freak play, Gonzalez was hit in the left foot by a foul ball off the bat of Jordan Pacheco when he was standing in the on-deck circle in the first inning. Fortunately for the Rockies, X-rays came back negative. Fowler was later hit in the hand by a pitch while pulling back on a bunt attempt in the third inning, but was diagnosed with a right ring finger contusion. While he’s dealing with some swelling and can’t grip the bat at the moment, it appears that Tulowitzki could miss the most time among the injured trio.

Dodgers, Cubs could be interested in Justin Verlander

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Jon Morosi of MLB Network said yesterday that the Detroit Tigers and Chicago Cubs have been engaged in trade talks involving starting pitcher Justin Verlander and catcher Alex Avila. Morosi also noted that the Los Angeles Dodgers have shown interest in Verlander as well. Whether this is idyl chitchatting of serious dispute is unclear, of course. Everything is unclear in the leadup to the deadline.

The veteran right-hander is carrying a 4.50 with a 120/57 K/BB ratio over 124 innings. Verlander impressed last year, finishing second in AL Cy Young Award balloting, but he has fallen back to Earth in 2017. His velocity remains high, however, and it’s not hard to imagine him going on a solid run in a way that could help a contender. He is owed $56 million over the next two seasons, however, and has a $22 million option that could vest for 2020, so negotiations for him could be tough. If the Tigers want talent back, they’ll have to eat salary.

Verlander got an ovation from a Detroit crowd last night which seemed to sense that, yes, it’s possible he pitched his last game for the Tigers. Given that he has 10/5 rights, allowing him to veto any trade, that decision is ultimately up to him. It’s not hard to imagine him accepting a trade to a contender, however.

We wait see.

A 30-year-old rookie won his major league debut

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The Dodgers beat the Twins last night thanks to a Cody Bellinger three-run homer. But Bellinger was not the only Dodgers rookie who had a notable game. A far more unconventional one is worth mentioning as well.

That rookie is reliever Edward Paredes, who made his big league debut last night. What makes him unconventional: he’s 30. Turns 31 in September, actually. Paredes pitched professionally for 12 years before making it to The Show. Most of that time was in the affiliated minors in the Mariners, Indians, Angels and Dodgers organizations. He spent time in the independent Atlantic League in 2013-15 as well.

Paredes did not do anything heroic last night. It was more of a right place/right time kind of appearance, retiring the side in order with a fly out, line out and a ground out and remaining the pitcher of record while Bellinger hit that three-run homer. That’s enough for a W, though. A W that Paredes waited a lot longer for than most pitchers who notch one in the bigs.