Bruce Bochy, Jim Leyland announce four underachieving managers as All-Star coaches

30 Comments

All-Star teams are managed by the previous year’s pennant-winning managers. All-Star coaches are picked by those managers. Those managers — Bruce Bochy and Jim Leyland — have picked their coaches. From the MLB press release:

Bochy has named Mets manager Terry Collins and Washington Nationals skipper Davey Johnson, who guided the Mets to the 1986 World Series Championship, as his N.L. coaches …  Leyland has invited Chicago White Sox manager Robin Ventura and Toronto Blue Jays manager John Gibbons to represent the American League.

Depending on how bad you thought the Mets would be, all four coaches helm underachieving squads this year. Which means that Don Mattingly and Mike Scioscia were snubbed, apparently.

The NL will be filled out by Bochy’s Giants staff – third base coach Tim Flannery, bullpen coach Mark Gardner, first base coach Roberto Kelly, hitting coach Joe Lefebvre, hitting coach Hensley Meulens, pitching coach Dave Righetti and bench coach Ron Wotus.  The Mets head trainer Ray Ramirez and the Nationals head athletic trainer Lee Kuntz will be there too.

In the AL it’s Leyland’s Tigers coaches – Rafael Belliard (first base), Tom Brookens (third base), Toby Harrah (assistant hitting), Jeff Jones (pitching), Gene Lamont (bench), Lloyd McClendon (hitting) and Mike Rojas (bullpen) – will come to New York.  Head athletic trainers Ron Porterfield of the Tampa Bay Rays and Rick Jameyson of the Boston Red Sox will fix the owies.

And remember: this time it counts again. So if Tom Brookens is coaching third base, look for some nice putouts at the plate.

Yankees’ offense wakes up, leads way to 8-1 win vs. Astros in ALCS Game 3

Elsa/Getty Images
4 Comments

The Yankees’ offense finally woke up, scoring eight runs in Game 3 of the ALCS on Monday night while the pitching kept the Astros’ offense at bay. That came after scoring a total of two runs against Astros pitching in the first two games. For a recap of the Yankees’ scoring in Game 3, click here.

CC Sabathia wasn’t dominant, but he executed pitches when he needed to most, preventing the Astros from capitalizing on their opportunities. Overall, he gave up three hits and four walks while striking out five on 99 pitches. He’s the first pitcher, age 37 or older, to throw six shutout innings in the postseason since Pedro Martinez for the Phillies against the Dodgers in Game 2 of the 2009 NLCS. Monday’s start also marked Sabathia’s first career scoreless outing in the postseason — it was his 22nd postseason appearance.

Astros starter Charlie Morton couldn’t escape the fourth inning, when he allowed a run and loaded the bases before departing. Will Harris allowed all three inherited runners to score on Aaron Judge‘s three-run home run to left field. Morton was ultimately charged with seven runs on six hits, two walks, and a hit batsman with three strikeouts in 3 2/3 innings.

The Yankees’ bullpen held the fort after the sixth. Adam Warren worked a scoreless seventh. Warren returned in the eighth and retired the side in order, despite yielding a pair of well-struck balls to deep center field.

In the ninth, Dellin Betances walked both hitters he faced to start the frame. Unsurprisingly, manager Joe Girardi had a short leash and brought in Tommy Kahnle. Kahnle gave up a single to Cameron Maybin then struck out George Springer, but walked Alex Bregman to force in a run. Kahnle got Jose Altuve to ground into a 4-3 double play to end the game in an 8-1 victory, giving the Yankees their first win of the series.

The ALCS continues on Tuesday at 5 PM ET. The Astros will start Lance McCullers and the Yankees will send Sonny Gray to the hill.