Bruce Bochy, Jim Leyland announce four underachieving managers as All-Star coaches

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All-Star teams are managed by the previous year’s pennant-winning managers. All-Star coaches are picked by those managers. Those managers — Bruce Bochy and Jim Leyland — have picked their coaches. From the MLB press release:

Bochy has named Mets manager Terry Collins and Washington Nationals skipper Davey Johnson, who guided the Mets to the 1986 World Series Championship, as his N.L. coaches …  Leyland has invited Chicago White Sox manager Robin Ventura and Toronto Blue Jays manager John Gibbons to represent the American League.

Depending on how bad you thought the Mets would be, all four coaches helm underachieving squads this year. Which means that Don Mattingly and Mike Scioscia were snubbed, apparently.

The NL will be filled out by Bochy’s Giants staff – third base coach Tim Flannery, bullpen coach Mark Gardner, first base coach Roberto Kelly, hitting coach Joe Lefebvre, hitting coach Hensley Meulens, pitching coach Dave Righetti and bench coach Ron Wotus.  The Mets head trainer Ray Ramirez and the Nationals head athletic trainer Lee Kuntz will be there too.

In the AL it’s Leyland’s Tigers coaches – Rafael Belliard (first base), Tom Brookens (third base), Toby Harrah (assistant hitting), Jeff Jones (pitching), Gene Lamont (bench), Lloyd McClendon (hitting) and Mike Rojas (bullpen) – will come to New York.  Head athletic trainers Ron Porterfield of the Tampa Bay Rays and Rick Jameyson of the Boston Red Sox will fix the owies.

And remember: this time it counts again. So if Tom Brookens is coaching third base, look for some nice putouts at the plate.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.