MLB’s civil case against Biogenesis and others is still proceeding. One of the others is interesting.

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Part of MLB’s deal with Anthony Bosch is that the league will dismiss the lawsuit it filed against him. It hasn’t done that yet. Which isn’t terribly surprising as MLB is still probably wanting to ensure continued cooperation from him and to ensure that they get something of value from him. The court likely won’t make the league do anything until various deadlines approach that require its attention.

But there are other defendants besides Bosch. One of them is his former colleague who is alleged by MLB to have also given players PEDs. His name is Carlos Acevedo and just this afternoon his latest request to have the lawsuit against him dismissed was denied, so he’s still in MLB’s crosshairs.

Acevedo is an interesting character here. I presume his defense — in addition to some statute of limitations grounds mentioned in the linked article — will be that he had nothing to do with Biogenesis. Which may be technically true. However, Acevedo and Bosch were partners in a predecessor anti-aging clinic before they had a falling out and went their separate ways. And it wasn’t too terribly long ago that this happened. The third partner in that clinic, a guy named Xavier Romero, left with Acevedo. He told the New York Times a couple of months ago that (a) he didn’t do anything with athletes; and (b) Bosch was a wreck and that he was surprised that he’d be able to lure baseball players as clients. The article also noted that Acevedo had a good reputation in the anti-aging community and worked with solid medical companies in the past.

Which makes me wonder about Major League Baseball’s interest in Acevedo. Do they think that he was a source of PEDs to players? If so, you’d think he’d be a better target for cooperation than Bosch, given his apparently more august standing in the world, his greater ability (in Romano’s view, one presumes) to lure high profile clients; and, by extension, his fewer credibility problems. On the other hand, if they don’t think he was involved, this lawsuit, with respect to Acevedo anyway, stinks to high heavens.

While I disagreed with Major League Baseball’s lawsuit when it was filed and still believe it’s the weakest legal sauce imaginable, I don’t think MLB is in the business of harassing truly innocent parties, which is what they’d be doing here if Acevedo didn’t have some sort of involvement in providing drugs to players. Which makes me think that maybe they’re trying to do with Acevedo what they did with Bosch: flip him and get him to talk about players’ drug use. Which suggests that either MLB doesn’t think that it yet has the goods or that it’s being extremely deliberate as it builds its case.

If they do have the goods on the players, though, you’d think they’d quit pursuing Acevedo, right?

Report: Christian Yelich’s relationship with Marlins ‘irretrievably broken’

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Joe Longo, the agent of Marlins outfielder Christian Yelich, said his client’s relationship with the Marlins is “irretrievably broken,” ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports. He believes in the best interest of both Yelich and the Marlins to work out a trade before the start of spring training.

Longo said,

They have a plan. I respect that plan, but that plan shouldn’t include Christian at this point in his career. He’s in the middle of the best years of his career, and having him be part of a 100-loss season is not really where [we] want to see him going.

The relationship between player and team is irretrievably broken. It’s soured. He’s part of the old ownership regime. The new ownership regime needs to get new parts into this plan and move forward, and he needs to get on with his career where he’s got a chance to win. The big issue is him winning and winning now.

He loves the city of Miami. He loves the fans. He’s had nothing but a good experience in South Florida, and he feels sorry where they ended up. But I think having him report [to spring training] and attempting to include him moving forward is going to be uncomfortable for both sides. I don’t see how it’s going to work.

This certainly comes as no surprise considering the offseason the Marlins have had after installing new ownership, going from Jeffrey Loria to Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter. The club traded All-Star outfielder Giancarlo Stanton, who hit 59 home runs last season, as well as Dee Gordon and Marcell Ozuna. As Crasnick notes, Yelich isn’t the only player to express disappointment with the Marlins’ current direction — J.T. Realmuto and Starlin Castro have as well.

Yelich, 26, signed a seven-year, $49.57 million contract extension with the Marlins in March of 2015. Given his career performance, that’s a bargain of a contract, which is why more than a handful of teams have inquired with the Marlins about him this offseason. Yelich finished the past season with a .282/.369/.439 triple-slash line along with 18 home runs, 81 RBI, 100 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 695 plate appearances.