Your morning dose of steroids McCarthyism

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There has always been a broad suspicion about steroids that seemed to exceed the actual data available about steroid use. Not necessarily an unwarranted suspicion. We don’t know who did what, it’s reasonable to assume that more players used than were ever caught and thus a lot of that broad suspicion was probably reasonable too. It became problematic when people would level unfounded accusations against specific players, but the idea that “a whole lot more people than we know of were using” is hard to dispute.

As a result, the idea that there has been some sort of steroid McCarthyism is unfair. Yes, some people have engaged in guilt-by-association, especially when accusing specific players based only on their teammates or country of origin, but most people who have voiced concern about steroids have, at the worst, offered some overly-broad generalizations and have drawn what I feel to be overly-pessimistic conclusions.

But Jim Rich of the New York Daily News has decided to go full-McCarthy on Joe Girardi and Terry Francona: they’re “frauds” and “hypocrites” and “jokes” for not condemning Yankees and Red Sox players who used PEDs or speculating on the Biogenesis stuff.  This is offensive to Rich because Girardi and Francona “stood shoulder to shoulder with steroid cheats.” He winds up:

As selfish and infuriating as the two managers’ stances are on the steroid issue, their most egregious hypocrisy lies in the fact that they have managed or played with so many other unnamed cheats, who, in part, were allowed to tarnish the game as a result of their willing blindness.

Francona and Girardi certainly have had plenty of company in allowing this fraud on the game and its fans to exist, but there have been very few who have basked more in its tainted glow.

This is literally condemnation by virtue of association. Rich, like McCarthy, is giving Girardi and Francona a choice between ratting out and/or calling out their colleagues or being considered just as bad as they are.

This is my favorite passage, though:

While Rodriguez was launching 129 of those bombs under Girardi’s watch, the Yankees manager was more than happy to discuss them, presumably because that qualified as baseball talk. But now that every one of A-Rod’s 2,901 career hits (37th most) must be called into question as the result of his second association with steroid use … Girardi feels he’s exempt from the discussion?

If Rich actually believes that Alex Rodriguez possessed no baseball talent that every single one of his hits came by virtue of steroid use it perhaps shouldn’t be surprising that he sees this as such a white or black issue.

People wonder why we can’t have an intelligent discussion about PEDs. It’s because it’s impossible to have an intelligent discussion with extremists peddling this kind of garbage.

Report: Blue Jays and Marco Estrada nearing agreement on contract extension

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Jon Morosi reports that the Blue Jays and starter Marco Estrada are nearing an agreement on a contract extension. The deal is expected to be for one guaranteed year, Morosi adds.

Estrada, 34, was set to become a free agent after the season. He earned $26 million on a two-year contract signed with the Jays in November 2015. While the right-hander has a subpar 4.84 ERA on the season, he has a solid 170/67 K/BB ratio in 176 2/3 innings and has looked much better since the end of July. Between July 31 and his most recent start on Saturday, Estrada owns a 3.75 ERA.

J.A. Happ is the only other starter technically under contract with the Jays next season. Marcus Stroman will be eligible for his second year of arbitration and the Jays will certainly agree to give him a raise on his $3.4 million salary for the 2017 season. The Jays will likely be active this offseason in adding rotation help and they’re starting early by locking up Estrada.

Video: Jackie Bradley, Jr. robs Chris Davis of a home run

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Red Sox center fielder Jackie Bradley, Jr. robbed Orioles first baseman Chris Davis of his 25th home run on Tuesday evening, leaping at the fence in center field to make the catch and keep the game scoreless in the bottom of the fifth inning.

Davis swung at the first pitch he saw from Drew Pomeranz, a slider that crossed the middle of the plate.

This game has potential playoff implications, as the first-place Red Sox hold a three-game lead over the Yankees in the NL East. Meanwhile, the Orioles are still in the AL Wild Card race, trailing the Twins by 5.5 games for the second Wild Card slot.