Mets demote .161-hitting Ike Davis to Triple-A

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Well, no one can say the Mets didn’t give Ike Davis an opportunity to turn things around.

After sticking with Davis for 55 games of a brutal .161 batting average and .500 OPS the Mets demoted the 26-year-old first baseman back to Triple-A, where he last played in 2010.

Here’s what general manager Sandy Alderson said about the demotion, via Mike Vorkunov of the Newark Star Ledger:

I think with something like this you just have to say to yourself, this is not in his best interest. And I’ve been one of his biggest supporters. I just felt that at some point we’ve got to get him out of here. Hopefully he’ll be back in a short period of time. But he needs to go there. He needs to be able to play every day. He needs to be able to work on his swing without worrying, necessarily, about the outcome. We felt this is in his best interests.

That sounds about right. Last season Davis got off to a similarly brutal start before eventually turning things around with a big second half, but counting on that happening again would be wishful thinking. No player in baseball has more plate appearances and lower OPS than Davis this season and if he’s going to tinker with his mechanics it’s obviously better to do that in games that ultimately don’t matter a ton. And in the meantime the Mets are better off, as they might actually get some production at first base.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.