Anthony Bosch asked A-Rod for money before agreeing to help out MLB

124 Comments

Just another avenue for cross-examination of MLB’s star witness should they attempt to suspend players in the Biogenesis thing. From the Daily News:

The owner of the South Florida anti-aging clinic at the center of baseball’s latest doping scandal asked embattled Yankee star Alex Rodriguez for financial help after Major League Baseball filed a lawsuit that alleged he had sold performance-enhancing drugs to Major League Baseball players.

When Rodriguez rebuffed Anthony Bosch’s request for money, believed to be in the hundreds of thousands, the self-styled “biochemist” turned to a strange bedfellow — MLB.

The Daily News spins this as MLB being “worried” and concerned about what Bosch might do and then reaching out to assist him. It’s worth asking, however, if Bosch was seeking cash in all of this before, what exactly is he getting from MLB now? It has been reported that MLB has agreed to drop the lawsuit it filed against him earlier this year, to pay his legal bills, to indemnify him for any civil liability that arises from his cooperation, to provide him with personal security and to intervene on his behalf if he gets into criminal trouble of his own. That stuff is all very valuable.

But if this report is accurate, he was seeking cash from A-Rod very recently. Is he now getting cash from MLB? Did he approach any other players in order to get cash before? All witnesses in Bosch’s situation are vulnerable to cross-examination about what they’re getting in exchange for their testimony. But if it’s cash on the barrelhead for non-expert testimony or if he has peddled his loyalty to both sides of the case and decided to go all-in with the one who gave him the best deal, his credibility is in even greater trouble than your typical hired-gun witness.

There have been reports of ex-Biogenesis employees trying to sell documents to the press, essentially holding an auction for information. Has Anthony Bosch done the same thing with his testimony? If we don’t find out before MLB takes any action in this matter, we will certainly find out when the players and the union’s lawyers attack Bosch with it in an arbitration later.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

Getty Images
5 Comments

The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
1 Comment

If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.