Alex Rodriguez releases a statement about the Biogenesis stuff

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Alex Rodriguez was one of several players implicated in the ongoing Biogenesis investigation by Major League Baseball. He released a statement through a publicist today which reveals that he is not exactly pleased with the specifics of the investigation being leaked to ESPN by Major League Baseball for its report on Tuesday evening:

“Myself and others are being mentioned in a media report before the process is even concluded.  I would hope this thing would follow the guidelines of our Basic Agreement.  I will monitor the situation and comment when appropriate. As I have said previously, I am working out every day to get back on the field and help the Yankees win a championship.  I am down here doing my job and working hard and will continue to do so until I’m back playing.”

A-Rod is referring to the terms of the the Joint Drug Agreement which require all parties involved to maintain the confidentiality of all drug investigations. Whoever from MLB leaked the information about the league’s investigation to ESPN violated the confidentiality required. But as I noted the other night, MLB is not really good at learning from history.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.