Notre Dame Cal Poly Baseball

2013 MLB Draft: Picks 21-33 – Yankees make their three first-round picks

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Rays selected catcher Nick Ciuffo with the 21st pick in the 2013 draft.
The second high school catcher to go, Ciuffo has a promising left-handed bat with quite a bit of power potential. He’s still rather raw behind the plate, but he has a good arm and the tools to turn into an adept catcher in time.

Orioles drafted high school right-hander Hunter Harvey 22nd overall.
Hunter is the son of former major league closer Bryan Harvey. The hope is that Hunter will make it as a starter with his low-90s fastball, curveball and changeup, and he could add some velocity as he fills out. There’s a lot of upside here.

Rangers picked Oral Roberts right-hander Alex Gonzalez with the 23rd selection.
Yes, another Alex Gonzalez. This one pitches, though. He’s not very polished for a college pitcher, but his low-90s moving fastball could prove to be an excellent weapon. He also has a slider. Some think he’s more likely to make it as a reliever than as a starter.

Athletics picked high school outfielder Billy McKinney 24th overall.
McKinney figures to hit for both average and power, but he probably won’t be an asset defensively in the process. He did play center in high school, but he figures to soon find himself in left field or maybe right as a pro.

Giants selected shortstop Christian Arroyo with the 25th pick in the draft.
Buster Posey excepted, the Giants don’t have nearly as much luck drafting hitters as pitchers. Still, Brian Sabean opted to go for a shortstop here. Arroyo is expected to stay at the position, but he was a surprise as a first-round pick. While the Giants obviously disagree, it seems like most project him as a utilityman.

Yankees took third baseman Eric Jagielo 26th overall in the draft.
With three of the last eight picks in the first round, the Yankees played it rather safe with the first pick. Jagielo upped his stock in the Cape Cod League last year and then hit .388/.500/.633 with nine homers for Notre Dame this season. He’s questionable to last at third base, and he may not run well enough to be an asset in an outfield corner either. He does possess plenty of power from the left side of the plate, so with hopes of playing in Yankee Stadium, he’s an intriguing fantasy prospect.

Reds selected Samford outfielder Philip Ervin with the 27th pick.
Ervin was the Cape Cod League MVP last year, giving him some momentum headed into his Junior season at Samford. Some teams liked him better as a pitcher, but the Reds drafted him as a center fielder. He’ll probably move to a corner later if Billy Hamilton develops as hoped.

Cardinals selected high school LHP Rob Kaminsky 28th overall.
The Cardinals took left-handers with both of their first-round picks, the difference being that this one is from the high school ranks. Kaminsky certainly has better pure stuff than 19th overall pick Marco Gonzales, but he’s a rather raw talent without much of a changeup at the moment.

Rays selected University of Arkansas RHP Ryne Stanek with the 29th overall pick.
Stanek, no relation to Ryne Sandberg, might be the steal of the first round at No. 29. The 21-year-old has struggled with consistency in college, but he has arguably the best fastball in the draft, a quality slider and the making of a legit curveball. The Rays have plenty of pitching in front of him, which is probably for the best. He’s not as close to being major league ready as some of the other college hurlers.

Rangers picked high school shortstop Travis Demeritte 30th overall Thursday.
This was supposed to be a very weak draft for middle infielders, but four shortstops went in the first round. Demeritte, though, is the least likely of the group to stay at the position, which would have been the case even if he wasn’t drafted by the team that already has Elvis Andrus and Jurickson Profar. The Rangers probably see him as a long-term third baseman.

Braves selected Oklahoma State right-hander Jason Hursh with the 31st pick in the draft.
The Braves gave up their first-round pick to sign B.J. Upton, but they got one back for losing Michael Bourn. Hursh, a Tommy John survivor, went 6-5 with a 2.79 ERA and an 86/28 K/BB ratio in 106 1/3 innings for the Cowboys this year. A sinkerballer, he could move quickly, though he doesn’t have the kind of upside one might prefer from a first-round pick.

Yankees picked Fresno State outfielder Aaron Judge with the 32nd selection.
Judge is a big guy, standing 6-foot-7, but he hit just six homes in his first two seasons for Fresno State before upping his total to 11 this year. On the other hand, he’s always been an excellent OBP guy, finishing his career with a .451 mark. If he learns to better use his strength to turn on fastballs, he could end up as one of the top hitters in the draft. He’s a worthy gamble for a team with three first-round picks.

Yankees took high school left-hander Ian Clarkin with the 33rd and final pick in the first round of Wednesday’s draft.
Clarkin throws in the low-90s and shows potential with both his curve and changeup, so it would have been no surprise had he gone 15 or 20 spots higher tonight. Command has been an issue, and he’s not someone who figures to rise through the ranks rapidly.

Mike Scioscia and the Angels played yesterday’s game under protest

KANSAS CITY, MO - JULY 27: Matt Shoemaker #52 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim throws to first as he tries to get the out on Raul Mondesi's #27 of the Kansas City Royals bunt in the seventh inning at Kauffman Stadium on July 27, 2016 in Kansas City, Missouri. Shoemaker's throwing error lead to Mondesi advancing to third and Alex Gordon and Paulo Orlando scoring.  (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
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The Royals beat the Angels last night, but Mike Scioscia is hoping Joe Torre and the Commissioner’s Office gives him a do-over.

The Angels played the game in protest following what they believe to be a rules misinterpretation following a base running incident in the seventh inning. That’s when Raul Mondesi reached on a bunt single which scored two runs following a throwing error from Angels pitcher Matt Shoemaker, whose attempt to put out Modesi sailed into right field. Watch the play:

Mike Scioscia came out claiming interference, arguing that Mondesi was not running within the baseline. The play was reviewed for over six minutes but the call — everyone’s safe and two runs scored — was upheld. After that Scioscia indicated tht he was playing under protest.

The thing about protests, though, is that they cannot be based on judgment calls. Rather, they have to be based on misapplication of rules by the umpires. Running outside of the baseline is a judgment call, though, right? So how can Scioscia protest it? Here’s his explanation:

“It’s not a judgement call. I would not have protested if I was not 100 percent correct on this. This is a misinterpretation of a rule. It was very clear. Phil Cuzzi, the home plate umpire, had Mondesi running inside the line in jeopardy the whole way, and stated that it’s okay because he was stepping back toward the bag, which is wrong.”

For his part, Royals manager Ned Yost believed it was a judgment call. For everyone’s part, protests are almost never upheld in baseball and, despite Scioscia’s comments, baseline calls are generally considered judgement calls.

If Scioscia is right, the game will be replayed, resuming with one out in the seventh inning and the runners where they started. But don’t hold your breath.

Politician behind the Braves new ballpark deal voted out of office

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Associated Press
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Tim Lee was the Cobb County commissioner who led the charge to build a new stadium for the Atlanta Braves in the northern suburbs. The operation, despite being taxpayer-funded, was not passed on by the voters beforehand and was cloaked in secrecy at every turn. Best of all, once Lee and his fellow commissioners started taking heat for it, he held his critics in contempt and shut down any effort to examine the deal in public meetings or to allow dissent to it by the people he claimed to represent.

That’s not a great look for a public official. Which is why Lee is now a former public official:

Incumbent Chairman Tim Lee lost his reelection bid Tuesday to challenger Mike Boyce, a retired marine colonel, in a runoff seen by many as a litmus test for support of the deal to bring the Atlanta Braves to Cobb.

Boyce beat Lee, winning 64 percent of the vote, with all precincts reporting.

If you read that linked article, you’ll be amused to see that Lee’s supporters blame his defeat on Donald Trump and general anti-incumbent sentiment. To the folks watching that race, however, it was obvious that this was a referendum on bringing the Braves to Cobb County in the manner that Lee did. His opponent, also a Republican, ran a grassroots campaign that was explicitly about Lee’s lack of transparency and, in many respects, total secrecy in spending hundreds of millions of public dollars on the sort of project which study after study has shown does not provide economic benefits to the public in any way approaching the degree to which it simply enriches the owners of professional sports teams. Lee’s opponent, Mike Boyce, said this after his victory:

“Cobb County is a very conservative county and people simply want the respect shown to them that if you’re going to use their money, you have to ask them,” Boyce said.

Doesn’t seem all that controversial, Trumpian or anti-incumbent to me. That just seems like good sense.

Not that Lee is going away quietly. After his defeat, he said this:

I wanted to make a positive difference for my community. Thirteen years later, I can safely say that I’ve done that. In my last term, Cobb County landed the biggest economic development deal in its modern history. That investment – however unfairly maligned and misrepresented – is already paying off and will enrich this community long after many of us are gone . . . The election is over; our friendship is not. How about we catch a ballgame together? I know a great place about to open up. It’s in the neighborhood.

I’m assuming Lee will have free Braves tickets for life after what he did for them so, yes, he’ll always be at the ballgame. And yes, I’m sure he’ll always consider the stadium to have been economically beneficial because he’ll just point to a ballpark full of fans and, eventually, a winning Braves ballclub and claim that makes everyone’s life better. If he chooses to measure the ballpark’s economic impact the way actual economists do, however, as opposed to the way professional sports teams and their crony politicians do, I’m guessing he’ll have to reassess that stuff about how great all of this has been.

Not that I ever expect him to measure it that way. No one in power ever does. They’re too busy hobnobbing with retired ballplayers and team executives in the luxury suites and explaining away their failure to fund true public works and services as either something wholly unavoidable or the fault of someone else.