Bud Selig

Source: Major League Baseball has not yet decided to discipline Biogenesis players

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A source familiar with the Biogenesis investigation tells HardballTalk that Major League Baseball plans to interview all of the players implicated in the Biogenesis scandal by the end of June. Then, at that point, it will make a decision on whether to pursue discipline and how. The plan is for discipline to be leveled — if it is, indeed, leveled — by the first week of July.  Pursuant to the Joint Drug Agreement players will then have the right to appeal if discipline is imposed.

This information confirms ESPN’s Outside the Lines report from last night that Major League Baseball’s  investigation of Biogenesis is proceeding. However, any speculation that Major League Baseball has already decided to discipline the players implicated in the Biogenesis scandal or that it has already decided to impose any specific penalties, be they 50- or 100-game suspensions, was premature. The league’s investigation is being assisted by clinic founder Tony Bosch, the source confirmed.

When contacted by HardballTalk, Major League Baseball officials did not comment on the story.

Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees, 2011 NL MVP Ryan Braun of the Milwaukee Brewers and Melky Cabrera of the Toronto Blue Jays – who received a 50-game suspension last season for the use of PEDs – are among the 20 players reportedly being targeted by MLB.

Braun issued a stern denial this morning, while Cabrera told USA Today Sports: “I don’t know anything about it. This is the first I hear of it. If they suspend me again, I think that would be a harsh punishment because I already served my sentence. But it’s up to them.”

Rodriguez, once considered a threat to break the sport’s all-time home run record, admitted to ESPN four years ago that he used performance-enhancing drugs earlier in his career, when he played for the Texas Rangers.

Zack Greinke named the Dbacks’ Opening Day starter

SCOTTSDALE, AZ - FEBRUARY 21:  Pitcher Zack Greinke #21 of the Arizona Diamondbacks poses for a portrait during photo day at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick on February 21, 2017 in Scottsdale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Not a surprise, but a news item on a slow news day is a news item on a slow news day: Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo has named Zack Greinke as the club’s Opening Day starter.

Greinke’s first season with the Diamondbacks is not exactly what the club hoped for when he signed a six-year, $206.5 million deal in December of 2015. He dealt with oblique and shoulder issues while struggling to a 4.37 ERA over 26 starts. Greinke hasn’t pitched yet this spring, but will make his spring debut on Friday. He and the club are obviously hoping for a quiet March and a strong beginning to the season.

Either for its own sake or to increase the trade value of a player who was acquired by the previous front office regime.

“La Vida Baseball,” celebrating Latino baseball, launches

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A new website has launched. It’s called “La Vida Baseball,” and it’s all about celebrating the past, present and future of Latino baseball from a Latino perspective.

The site, produced in partnership with the Hall of Fame, has four general areas of focus:

  • Who’s Now: Focusing on current Latino players;
  • Who’s Next: Focusing on top prospects here, in the Caribbean and in Central and South America;
  • Our Life: Off-the-Field stuff, including player’s lives, lifestyles and hobbies; and
  • Our Legends: Focusing on Latino baseball history, Hall of Famers and overlooked players.

As the site has just launched there aren’t yet a ton of stories up there, but there is one about Roberto Clemente, another about Felix Hernandez and some other stuff.

The site is much-needed. Baseball reporters for American outlets are overwhelmingly white, non-Spanish speakers. Reporters, who, generally, gravitate to the players who are the most like they are. Which is understandable on some level. When you’re writing stories about people you need to be able to communicate with them and relate to them on more than a mere perfunctory level. As such, no matter how good the intentions of baseball media, we tend to see the clubhouse and the culture of baseball from a distinctly American perspective. And we tend to paint Latino players with a broad, broad brush.

La Vida Baseball will, hopefully, remedy all of that and will, hopefully, give us a fresh and insightful depiction Latino players and their culture.