Great Moments in “if The Boss was alive”


As we’ve noted several times in the past, the easiest column a New York writer has is the “if The Boss was alive …” column. You lose your press pass, I assume, if you don’t crank out a couple of these a year. Ian O’Connor works to fill his quota today at ESPN New York:

Brian Cashman was on his way home from a four-game, two-stadium, one-city sweep suffered at the hands of the New York Mets when he fielded a question that summoned a bad memory from the not-too-distant past.

What would George Steinbrenner have said to you tonight?

Cashman paused over the phone as he measured the chilling thought. An inquiring mind thought the call had dropped before the general manager of the second-best team in New York this week finally broke the silence.

“I can’t even imagine,” he said.

It’s also possible that Cashman considered the thought far more silly than chilling, what with the fact that Steinbrenner has been dead for three years and hadn’t been actively running the team for several years before that. AND that The Boss that these columnists constantly invoke — the angry, fire-first, ask-questions-later Steinbrenner — more or less ceased to exist in the early 90s when he came back from his suspension. The latter-era Boss would bark a lot, but he also let Gene Michael and Brian Cashman run the teams most of the time.

Asking “What Would The Boss Do” may be a fun game for writers who wished they had the kind of drama now that they had back in the 70s and 80s, but it’s almost completely irrelevant to the state of the New York Yankees in 2013. And explaining the state of the New York Yankees in 2013 is sorta their job.

Justin Turner suffers broken wrist after being hit by a pitch

Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner left Monday’s Cactus League game against the Athletics after he was hit by a pitch. He went for X-rays, revealing that he suffered a broken wrist, Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports. Shaikin adds that Turner is unlikely to return before May, noting that Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman missed six weeks with a similar injury last year and Astros outfielder George Springer missed nine weeks in 2015.

Needless to say, this is a huge loss for the Dodgers. Last year, Turner hit .322/.415/.530 with 21 home runs and 71 RBI in 543 plate appearances, helping the Dodgers reach the World Series. He made the All-Star team for the first time in his career and finished eighth in NL MVP balloting.

Thankfully, the Dodgers have some versatile players on the roster. Logan Forsythe could move from second base to third, giving Chase Utley more playing time at second. Enrique Hernandez could man the hot corner as well. Chris Taylor has played some third base, or he could shift to second base in Forsythe’s stead. The club should shed some light on how it plans to move forward following Turner’s injury.