UPDATE: No, MLB is not using a 14″ CRT for replay

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UPDATE: A pretty big correction is in order.  Earlier today I was given a picture by a source who had access to a National League ballpark and who was told by a ballpark employee that the photo below was, in fact, the replay machine used at the park.  I have been told by Major League Baseball sources and sources from the ballpark in question that my source and the ballpark employee was mistaken. The picture is of a video monitor used by the groundscrew, not umpires for replays.

Major League Baseball shared with me photos of the actual replay monitors used. While I was told that I am not permitted to use the photos, I can describe them: they are 19″ Panasonic flat-panel monitors. I am told that they have HD capability. This conforms with what was reported about the state of the replay equipment used by MLB in the wake of the Angel Hernandez-Adam Rosales home run incident a couple of weeks ago. While there has been some question about whether the system was uniform, I am told by MLB that it is.

There is still much to be said about the state of replay in Major League Baseball and whether the current rules and procedures in place are sufficient to get the calls right. But it is not the case, contrary to my earlier post, that any park is using non-HD monitors for replay review.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.