Casey at the Bat

“Casey at the Bat” — baseball’s second best poem — was published 125 years ago

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Well, 125 years ago this coming Monday. Today, however, Dave D’Alessandro of the Newark Star-Ledger has a remembrance of baseball’s most famous poem, as well as some background on those who have tried to update “Casey at the Bat” for a more modern, more integrated game in past century and a quarter:

We integrated baseball 66 years ago, so why hasn’t anyone ever conceived of a more multicultural Casey?

“It seemed to be a natural,” [Lawrence] Hogan said. “I’ve been immersed in black baseball for so long, I’m always looking for different ways to tell its stories, and the time was right for this.”

So Hogan decided to apply one of baseball’s great pieces of fiction to the African American tableau, and the results will be shared over the next three nights at a symposium at the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown.

Sounds cool.

But it’s certainly not the first time efforts have been made to place baseball’s changing racial and ethnic face into poetry. Indeed, my favorite baseball poem is Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s “Baseball Canto,” which is at turns hilarious and revealing as it describes an inning featuring the heavily black and Latino San Francisco Giants of the 1960s. It’s even better when heard aloud in Ferlinghetti’s own voice:

Just another example of baseball — an inherently conservative institution — serving as a vehicle for change. Or, at the very least, a reflection of it.

All Marlins players will wear number 16 in honor of Jose Fernandez tonight

MIAMI, FL - JULY 09:  Jose Fernandez #16 of the Miami Marlins pitches during the game against the Cincinnati Reds at Marlins Park on July 9, 2015 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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The Marlins game was understandably cancelled yesterday. The baseball schedule has always gone on in such situations, however, and the Marlins will host the Mets tonight in Miami.

As they do so, they will all be wearing number 16, Jose Fernandez’s number, in honor of their fallen teammate.

A nice gesture on what will certainly be an emotional night.

Derek Falvey named Twins new president of baseball operations.

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - JUNE 9: General view of interleague play between the Minnesota Twins and the Chicago Cubs at Target Field on June 9, 2012 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Minnesota Twins defeated the Chicago Cubs 11-3. (Photo by Adam Bettcher/Getty Images)
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ESPN’s Keith Law reports the Twins have hired Derek Falvey as their new president of baseball operations.

Falvey has been the Indians assistant general manager for the past year after spending a decade with the organization. He’s only 33 and he’s analytically-inclined. Which, given that the Twins front office has been particularly young or analytically-inclined, should be a pretty major change of pace. It’s also worth noting that going from one year of experience as an assistant general manager all the way to president of baseball operations — who will presumably oversee a general manager of his own — is a big, big jump. Either the Twins have a LOAD of confidence in Falvey or else they were having serious issues finding more experienced candidates. Of course both of those things could be true.

The Twins’ longtime general manager, Terry Ryan, was fired in July. The club lost its 100th game yesterday, marking only the second time since the franchise moved to Minnesota that it has lost that many games.