Brewers’ Jean Segura is first in four years to collect six hits

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Jean Segura tied a Brewers record Tuesday by going 6-for-7 in a 14-inning loss to the Twins. 

All of Segura’s hits were singles. The last was a liner to right that would have been caught by a better defender than Ryan Doumit, but it was still hit pretty sharply. It made him the first player with six hits in a game since Adrian Gonzalez got there for the Padres on Aug. 11, 2009, against the Brewers.

Other six-hit facts:

– Segura is the third Brewer to collect six hits in a game. John Briggs was the first, going 6-for-6 on Aug. 4, 1973. Kevin Reimer also did it in the second game of a doubleheader on Aug. 24, 1993. Apparently, it’s a once-every-twenty-years kind of thing.

– He became the first shortstop with six hits since Cleveland’s Omar Vizquel in 2004.

– He’s the first to do it in a losing cause since Boston’s Nomar Garciaparra on June 21, 2003.  The Red Sox lost to the Phillies 6-5 in 13 innings that day. The Brewers lost to the Twins 6-5 in 14 innings tonight. In the 13 six-hit games in between Garciaparra’s and Segura’s, the teams have all scored at least 10 runs.

Segura reclaimed the NL lead in batting average from Joey Votto tonight, upping his mark from .347 to .365. With eight homers and 14 steals already, the 23-year-old is looking like a sure bet to make the All-Star team in his first full major league season. Unfortunately, he just missed out on Rookie of the Year eligibility, having gotten 151 at-bats last year.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.