Wilin Rosario

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


Rockies 5, Diamondbacks 4: One of four games to require ten frames last night. This from the AP gamer:

Reliever Matt Reynolds tried to outthink his former teammate, guess what pitch Wilin Rosario would be looking for and throw the opposite. Only, Rosario knew Reynolds was trying to get inside his head, so …

Long story short, Rosario spent the last few years building up an immunity to iocane powder, thus his game-winning RBI single in the 10th.

Angels 12, Mariners 0: As Matt noted, Trout hit for the cycle. May be the first bit of actual fun the Angels and their fans have had all year. Now, pardon me while I go relitigate the 2012 MVP race again like the Cabrera people did when he hit three homers the other night. Oh, wait, I won’t do that because I’m not a crazy person.

Orioles 3, Yankees 2: This one ended on a Nate McLouth walkoff bomb. Chris Dickerson hit two homers. Those homers were Phil Hughes’ only two blemished, but they were enough to get it to extras.

Pirates 5, Cubs 4: A pinch hit grand slam for Travis Snider in the sixth spoiled Matt Garza’s return. Garza pitched well but, unfortunately, the Cubs have a bullpen.

Tigers 5, Indians 1: Max Scherzer was dominant, allowing one earned run in eight innings and at one point retiring 22 straight Tribe hitters. Miguel Cabrera homered again and is now one bomb off Triple Crown pace.

Braves 5, Twins 4: Evan Gattis hit a tying homer in the ninth and Freddie Freeman singled in Jason Heyward in the tenth. It was Bobby Cox’ and Kent Hrbek’s birthdays yesterday. Glad one of ’em is sad and one of ’em is happy.

Rays 4, Blues Jays 3: The second straight Alex Cobb start that went 6.1 IP, 3 H, 1 ER. If he made that his thing he’d have a pretty nice career. A late rally for the Jays but it fell just short.

Reds 4, Mets 0: Mike Leake shut the Mets out on three hits over seven innings and the pen handled the other two. The Mets offense is, whoa.

Athletics 1, Rangers 0: Yu Darvish’s last start was billed as a pitcher’s duel. It wasn’t. This one was, but Drew Dan Straily bested him, tossing seven two-hit shutout innings.

Phillies 7, Marlins 3: I guess Ryan Howard’s knee is OK. The big guy drove in three on a pair of RBI singles. Delmon Young homered. Most of the Phillies damage came after Jose Fernandez left after five.

Brewers 5, Dodgers 2: Zack Greinke had a nice run at Miller Park when he was with the Brewers. Not so nice last night as he surrendered five runs on nine hits in four innings. The Dodgers offense all came via Greinke’s helping his own cause and a Nick Punto RBI. In other words, the big guns.

White Sox 3, Red Sox 1: Sox win.

Royals 7, Astros 3: Houston took a three-run lead into the top of the seventh and then the Royals put up 2, 4 and one-spots in the seventh, eighth and ninth. Is a one-spot a thing? OK, sure it is.

Cardinals 10, Padres 2: Adam Wainwright coulda sucked last night and the Cards still woulda been OK, what with five runs to play with while he was in the game. He didn’t suck (7.1 IP, 4 H, 1 ER, 6K). And the Cards woulda bailed him out with five more late runs anyway.

Giants 4, Nationals 2: The Braves rallied and one in the tenth, the Nats got rallied against and lost in the tenth. Trains heading in different directions this past week, with the Nats now 4.5 back. As for the Giants: a Gregor Blanco triple ties it in the ninth, a boooooming Pablo Sandoval wins it in the tenth.  We’ll have more on this one later this morning.

Supreme Court rejects San Jose’s appeal in the A’s case

The judge's gavel is seen in court room 422 of the New York Supreme Court at 60 Centre Street February 3, 2012. REUTERS/Chip East
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The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected an appeal from the city of San Jose arising out of the failure of the city’s antitrust claims against Major League Baseball. The lower court losses which frustrated the city’s lawsuit will stay in place.

By way of background, San Jose sued Major League Baseball in June 2013 for conspiring to block the A’s relocation there on the basis of the San Francisco Giants’ territorial claim. The city said the territory rules violated federal antitrust laws. As I wrote at the time, it was a theoretically righteous argument in a very narrow sense, but that the City of San Jose likely did not have any sort of legal standing to assert the claim for various reasons and that its suit would be unsuccessful.

And now it is.


If there is ever to be a righteous legal challenge of the territorial system, it’ll almost certainly have to come from a club itself. Given the way in which MLB vets its new owners, however, and given how much money these guys rake in, in part, because of the territorial system, its unlikely that that will ever happen.

MVP or not, Mike Trout’s place in history is secure

Mike Trout
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Mike Trout may not win another MVP award, because Josh Donaldson of the Blue Jays had a great season and voters seem to be leaning his way, but the Angels center fielder just completed his fourth MVP-caliber campaign in four full seasons as a major leaguer.

Trout has now either won the MVP or (presumably) finished runner-up at age 20, age 21, age 22, and age 23. And there were certainly cases to be made that he was deserving of all four MVP awards. It’s been an incredible start to a career. But how incredible?

Here are the all-time leaders in Wins Above Replacement through age 23:

37.6 – Mike Trout
36.0 – Ty Cobb
34.2 – Ted Williams
31.4 – Mel Ott
30.1 – Ken Griffey Jr.
29.7 – Mickey Mantle
27.7 – Alex Rodriguez
27.5 – Al Kaline
26.7 – Arky Vaughan
26.5 – Rogers Hornsby

I mean, just look at the 10 names on that list. Ridiculous, and Trout sits atop all of them.

Trout has been the subject of intense MVP-related debates in three of his four seasons, but regardless of which side of that coin you favor don’t let it obscure the fact that we’re witnessing something truly special here. There’s certainly room to quibble with the exact rankings–WAR is merely one prominent and easy way to do such things–but however you slice it Trout has been one of the best handful of players in the history of baseball through age 23.