Baseball’s discrimination against old players has to stop

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Sorry. That headline may have been a bit dramatic. But see, I turn 40 in July. And while I’m generally cool with that — and while I am, in all honestly, in The Best Shape of My Life — it has dawned on me pretty clearly that we are almost to the point where there are NO MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYERS OLDER THAN ME.  This is sobering.

I’m thinking about this because just this afternoon Miguel Batista was released. Just yesterday Derek Lowe was DFA’d. Mariano Rivera will retire after the season is over. Those are three of the very small handful of players left who were born before July 14, 1973. And while it doesn’t mean a heck of a lot when you think hard about it, it’s kinda sobering when you think casually about it. Athletes have always, in my mind anyway, been older than me. I know that that has mostly not been true for many years now, but soon that will almost be 100% not the case.

Assuming Lowe and Batista don’t latch on, who’s left older than your aging blogger here? Darren Oliver. Jason Giambi. Henry Blanco. Jose Contreras. Raul Ibanez. Andy Pettitte. LaTroy Hawkins. Ramon Ortiz. Bartolo Colon. That’s it, I believe.

Hold on guys. Hold on with all of your might.

Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto reportedly asks to be traded

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Craig Mish of MLB Network Radio is reporting that Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto has requested a trade out of Miami. Jon Heyman is characterizing it as Realmuto telling the team that he “wouldn’t mind” a trade.

Either way, Realmuto has no power to force a trade. This isn’t the NBA or something. Still, it’s evidence of just how dreary a prospect remaining in Miami is for Marlins veterans in the wake of trades that sent Giancarlo Stanton to New York, Marcell Ozuna to St. Louis.

Realmuto, who will turn 27 just before the 2018 season, hit .278/.332/.451 with 17 homers, 65 RBI, and eight steals over 141 games this past season. He only has three years of service time and is arbitration eligible for the first time this offseason. He made just $562K in the 2017 and will get a big raise this year, but he’s still going to be underpaid based on his production. If the Marlins wanted to trade him, they’d get a nice return. Why they would want to trade him, I have no idea.

Expect more of this sort of thing as the Marlins slash payroll and make it clear that their immediate priorities are more about saving money and less about winning baseball games. Which may or may not be a valid goal for the team’s new owners, but is certainly a letdown for baseball players and fans.