Shane Victorino: “I got to have these, man. My addiction’s getting so bad.”

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Sad. Shane has so many friends and teammates looking out for him, yet he is still spiraling into addiction. And he doesn’t seem to care about it. And because he makes good money, the fact that each hit costs hundreds of dollars doesn’t work as a deterrent for him like it would most people.

No, it’s not drugs. Who said anything about drugs? It’s high-end basketball shoes, as Mike Bernadino of the Pioneer Press reports. He talks to Victorino and Vance Worley, who are friends and fellow shoe addicts, about their addiction:

“He’s having a hard time getting a hold of this one pair that just came out the other day,” Worley said. “He’s like, ‘I know you got a guy.’ I’m like, ‘I’m not saying I don’t have a guy. What’s the importance of this shoe versus another one?’ He’s like, ‘I got to have these, man. My addiction’s getting so bad.’ “

I don’t know why people who don’t play a lot of basketball get into high-end basketball shoes, but if Worley and Victorino have to be addicted to something, I can think of way worse things.

*UPDATE: when I first posted this I had the quotes wrong, mistakenly reading it as Victorino quoting Worley, not the other way around. Fixed now. No matter, though, because they’re both sick twists with this stuff.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.