Joe Torre: “The game isn’t perfect”

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Baseball’s head of replay and umpiring went on the Dan Patrick show and makes it clear: he doesn’t want the adequate to be the enemy of the low-end-of-mediocre. But he is for expanded replay because, he says, that it’s bad when people pay more attention to the missed calls than the game.

Which is fine, but his tone suggests that he’d prefer people to simply ignore the bad call than to have to go through the trouble of actually getting it right. They won’t, though, so fine, more replay it is and we’ll get on it eventually.

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Encouraging, though? He sounds a bit skeptical of the “nerve center” model of replay, in which calls would be made from a central location. I think that could work, but it’s my second choice to a fifth umpire in the booth at each park.

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.