Catching up with the man Matt Bush almost killed

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Former Rays prospect Matt Bush is in jail for almost killing a man in a drunken hit-and-run accident last year. Joe Smith of the Tampa Bay Times catches up with Bush’s victim, Tony Tufano:

Tufano, speaking publicly for the first time, said Wednesday that while he doesn’t remember the crash, the pain he feels is a daily reminder. Tufano hopes Bush can turn his life around, but he believes both Bush and the Rays should share some responsibility in what happened.

“He (messed) me up, plain and simple,” Tufano told the Tampa Bay Times. “To put it in a nutshell, and it sounds crazy, but I still feel deformed. I don’t feel like I have the body I had before. … They say, that’s what happened to me. But if that … jerk wasn’t out there drunk, we wouldn’t be talking right now.”

True. I don’t really buy the notion that the Rays have any legal responsibility here and chalk that part up to a lawyer looking for a deep pocket, but Tufano’s anger is understandable. Still, he has some charitable words for Bush, hoping that he uses his time in prison to turn his life around and noting that he’ll still be young when finishes his four year, three months sentence.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.