Terry Collins: “I don’t answer to fans”

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He doesn’t. But it’s one of those things that you tend to do better never actually saying. But Collins said it anyway yesterday, in response to the flap in which Mets players did not appear to have Jordany Valdespin’s back after he got plunked by a Pirates pitcher on Saturday night:

“I don’t answer to fans,” Collins said before the Mets’ 10-4 loss in St. Louis. “They don’t play this game. They have no idea what goes on. They have no idea what goes on in there. They have absolutely no idea what it means to be a professional teammate at this level.”

I don’t disagree with anything Collins said there. Nor do I disagree with the Mets not congratulating Valdespin on his homer Friday or retaliating for him being plunked afterward. He was showboating when the team was down by a substantial margin. And while I don’t much care for pitchers hitting guys on purpose, baseball players all knew that Valdespin was out of line per their unwritten rules and the Mets were acting in accord with those rules. Mike Francesa doesn’t like it? Cry me a freakin’ river. The guy is a clown.

At the same time, however, Collins has been around long enough, one would hope, to know that the response to this sort of flap should be to diffuse it with either wit or boring cliches. Not to be prickly about it and never, ever, to go after fans like that. By doing so he gave this little non-story new life — you can bet that Francesa and the yakkers will be all over it today — and has helped create a distraction.

Which maybe shouldn’t be all that surprising. Collins has been a better, more mature manager with the Mets than he was back in the day with Houston and Anaheim. But this prickly little thing is reminiscent of his mid-to-late 90s oeuvre.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.