David Price leaves start with strained left triceps

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A frightening development tonight for Tampa Bay.

Rays left-hander David Price made an early exit from his start against the Red Sox after feeling some discomfort in his left triceps muscle. He appeared to be clenching his fist when a trainer came out to visit him, which suggests that there might have been pain shooting down his entire arm.

Price threw a scoreless first and second inning but yielded a walk and three singles in the third before departing. He wound up being charged with four earned runs on five hits and a walk in 2 1/3 innings. Jamey Wright relieved him and promptly allowed another four earned.

Price, 27, has an ugly 5.24 ERA and 1.44 WHIP through 55 total frames this season. He entered the year with a 3.16 career ERA and a 1.17 career WHIP. The Rays will reevaluate him on Thursday.

If Price needs a stint on the disabled list, the Rays could turn to top pitching prospect Jake Odorizzi.

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UPDATE, 11:01 PM EDT: Rays manager Joe Maddon told Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times after the game that Price has been diagnosed with a left triceps strain. He already underwent an MRI and Maddon said “nothing seems to be serious,” but Price is still likely to miss a couple of starts.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.