David Price leaves start with strained left triceps

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A frightening development tonight for Tampa Bay.

Rays left-hander David Price made an early exit from his start against the Red Sox after feeling some discomfort in his left triceps muscle. He appeared to be clenching his fist when a trainer came out to visit him, which suggests that there might have been pain shooting down his entire arm.

Price threw a scoreless first and second inning but yielded a walk and three singles in the third before departing. He wound up being charged with four earned runs on five hits and a walk in 2 1/3 innings. Jamey Wright relieved him and promptly allowed another four earned.

Price, 27, has an ugly 5.24 ERA and 1.44 WHIP through 55 total frames this season. He entered the year with a 3.16 career ERA and a 1.17 career WHIP. The Rays will reevaluate him on Thursday.

If Price needs a stint on the disabled list, the Rays could turn to top pitching prospect Jake Odorizzi.

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UPDATE, 11:01 PM EDT: Rays manager Joe Maddon told Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times after the game that Price has been diagnosed with a left triceps strain. He already underwent an MRI and Maddon said “nothing seems to be serious,” but Price is still likely to miss a couple of starts.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.