Zack Greinke makes rehab start, on track to join reeling Dodgers on Wednesday

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The high-priced Dodgers dropped their eighth straight game last night against the Marlins and currently sit in last place in the National League West with a disappointing 13-21 record, but there is some help on the way.

Zack Greinke allowed eight runs (three earned) in 4 1/3 innings last night in a minor league rehab start with High-A Rancho Cucamonga. It was his first game action since he suffered a broken collarbone in a benches-clearing brawl with Padres outfielder Carlos Quentin on April 11.

The results weren’t great, but it’s tough to put too much stock into them since Greinke’s defense committed three errors. The good news is that he struck out three without issuing a walk and didn’t have any discomfort with the collarbone. According to Ken Gurnick of MLB.com, Greinke feels that he’s ready to rejoin the Dodgers’ rotation.

“I am,” Greinke said when asked if he was ready to be activated. “I won’t be in midseason form, but I feel I’m able to get guys out.

“I just have to get my right arm ready. I’ll definitely head somewhere. I can’t say [where] without talking to somebody. I’m sure they’d rather me pitch better than the results. I felt I pitched OK. Get the lights of a Major League game and it’s different, you step up another notch.”

The Dodgers haven’t made an official announcement yet, but Greinke is currently lined up to face the Nationals on Wednesday at Dodger Stadium. The 29-year-old was originally expected to miss 6-8 weeks after surgery, but if activated Wednesday, he’ll have made it back in just over four weeks.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.