The Orioles want Alexi Casilla to give up switch-hitting

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Infielder Alexi Casilla is hitting .200/.222/.257 in 35 at-bats for the Orioles this season after coming in at .241/.282/.321 in 299 at-bats for the Twins last year. Hence, the Orioles think it’s time for him to try something new. In this case, they believe the natural right-handed hitter should give up switch-hitting.

The interesting thing about this is that Casilla doesn’t have pronounced splits. In fact, he has a higher OPS as a left-handed hitter in his career:

As a left-handed hitter: .246/.307/.339, 9 HR, 98 RBI in 1,094 at-bats
As a right-handed hitter: .258/.297/.322. 2 HR, 49 RBI in 516 at-bats

(That doesn’t count his five at-bats as a right-handed hitter against right-handed pitchers. I’m assuming those came versus knuckleballers.)

The Orioles, though, have declined to use Casilla against right-handers this season, even with Brian Roberts out and Ryan Flaherty struggling mightily as a replacement second baseman. Casilla has started 10 games, nine of which have come versus left-handers.

According to MASN”s Roch Kubatko, Casilla is going along with the idea. He intends to bat left-handed against righties for now, but he’s been taking batting practice right-handed against righties and it sounds like he’ll do it in games once he’s more comfortable.

Perhaps the Orioles’ hope is that Casilla, instead of trying to stay sharp from both sides of the plate and splitting his focus, will improve if he concentrates solely on hitting right-handed. It probably can’t hurt, since Casilla is very much in danger of getting bumped from the major leagues the way things are going now.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”