The Orioles want Alexi Casilla to give up switch-hitting

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Infielder Alexi Casilla is hitting .200/.222/.257 in 35 at-bats for the Orioles this season after coming in at .241/.282/.321 in 299 at-bats for the Twins last year. Hence, the Orioles think it’s time for him to try something new. In this case, they believe the natural right-handed hitter should give up switch-hitting.

The interesting thing about this is that Casilla doesn’t have pronounced splits. In fact, he has a higher OPS as a left-handed hitter in his career:

As a left-handed hitter: .246/.307/.339, 9 HR, 98 RBI in 1,094 at-bats
As a right-handed hitter: .258/.297/.322. 2 HR, 49 RBI in 516 at-bats

(That doesn’t count his five at-bats as a right-handed hitter against right-handed pitchers. I’m assuming those came versus knuckleballers.)

The Orioles, though, have declined to use Casilla against right-handers this season, even with Brian Roberts out and Ryan Flaherty struggling mightily as a replacement second baseman. Casilla has started 10 games, nine of which have come versus left-handers.

According to MASN”s Roch Kubatko, Casilla is going along with the idea. He intends to bat left-handed against righties for now, but he’s been taking batting practice right-handed against righties and it sounds like he’ll do it in games once he’s more comfortable.

Perhaps the Orioles’ hope is that Casilla, instead of trying to stay sharp from both sides of the plate and splitting his focus, will improve if he concentrates solely on hitting right-handed. It probably can’t hurt, since Casilla is very much in danger of getting bumped from the major leagues the way things are going now.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: