Baseball America thinks the White Sox target only ‘athletic’ outfielders

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I have some sympathy for anyone asked to do an MLB mock draft. Football and basketball are difficult enough, but baseball adds layers of extra complexity with the high school-college mix, signability issues, metal bats and so much else fouling in the mix. In a baseball mock draft, one might have a good idea of the top two or three picks, but there’s no surety after that. So, it makes sense to look at what teams did previously and see if there are some patterns that might repeat themselves. That’s what Baseball America’s Jim Callis did in projecting the White Sox pick in his mock today.

17. WHITE SOX: Chicago used its top choice on athletic outfielders in 2009 (Jared Mitchell), 2011 (Keenyn Walker) and 2012 (Courtney Hawkins), and could go that route again with Stanford’s Austin Wilson or Fresno State’s Aaron Judge, who have massive power potential and two of the best bodies in the draft. Sox executive Ken Williams is a former Cardinal outfielder himself.

PROJECTED PICK: AUSTIN WILSON.

OK, guys, three guesses what all of these “athletic” outfielders have in common. First two don’t count.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.