Florida health officials refer Anthony Bosch case to prosecutors

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The wheels grind slowly, but they grind:

The Florida Department of Health, which sent a cease-and-desist order to Biogenesis founder Anthony Bosch last month, says it has referred the case to the Miami State Attorney’s office and the Florida Attorney General’s office.

Ed Griffith, a spokesman for Miami State Attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle, said local prosecutors can’t initiate a criminal investigation into Bosch — who allegedly provided performance-enhancing drugs to Alex Rodriguez, Melky Cabrera and two dozen other Major League Baseball players — until health officials provide prosecutors with evidence of criminal activity.

All of this is relevant for baseball only insofar as heat can be applied to Bosch in a manner which gives him an incentive to call out baseball players.  Whether that is something that is at all valuable to the health officials who have thus far investigated him or prosecutors who will now consider the matter is an open question.

It was something interesting to federal prosecutors back in the Mitchell Report days and their desire to go after ballplayers has done absolutely nothing to benefit the careers of any federal prosecutors. Quite the contrary, actually. So it’s quite possible that all the Florida attorneys will care about is shutting down a crooked clinic and getting its owner behind bars.

Best way to do that: give ballplayers immunity and sealed testimony to sink him, actually. Which does not exactly help the aims of MLB in its desire to find dirt on these guys.

How Yu Darvish tipped his pitches during the World Series

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You hear a lot about pitchers tipping pitches. It’s often offered up post-facto as an excuse for poor performance by the pitcher himself or his own team. It’s sort of like the “best shape of my life” thing being offered in the offseason to talk about why the player got injured or played badly the previous year. “Smitty’s stuff is still great, he was just tipping his pitches,” said a source close to the player whose stuff is not really great anymore.

Which isn’t to say that pitchers don’t tip pitches. Of course they do. Opposing teams look for it, pick up on it and take advantage of it whenever they can. It’s just that (a) the opposing team has an interest in not talking about it, lest the pitcher STOP tipping its pitches; and (b) the guy actually tipping his pitches doesn’t want to talk specifically about it lest he starts doing it again.

Which is what makes this article at Sports Illustrated so interesting. In it Tom Verducci talks to an anonymous Houston Astros player who explains how Dodgers starter Yu Darvish was tipping his pitches during the World Series, leading to him getting absolutely shellacked in Games 3 and 7. The upshot: the Astros knew when a slider or a cutter was coming, they waited for it and they teed off.

Darvish is a free agent now. I’m guessing, whoever signs him, knows exactly what they’ll gave him work on the first day of spring training.