Angel Hernandez is being pretty cagey about his botched call last night

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Not only did Angel Hernandez botch the call on that home run/double last night, but he’s not been particularly forthcoming about it after the fact. Check this out from the San Francisco Chronicle’s Susan Slusser:

As Slusser notes in subsequent tweets, this is baffling, inasmuch as reporters recording interviews is actually a benefit to the interview subject. If the reporter screws up, he or she is accountable and there is a clear record of what was actually said. I know Angel Hernandez is not big on accountability and getting things right via technology, but this is just strange.

Well, maybe not too strange. There is at least some reason why someone may not want their interview recorded:

 

Creating situations in which there is deniability is something an insecure person does. And if you’ve watched Angel Hernandez’s behavior when he gets in arguments with managers and players, you can tell he reeks of insecurity. Umpires who stand by their calls don’t get mad and touchy like he does. Umpires who know they screwed up don’t either. They either admit it or at least let the manager say what he wants so as not to compound the issue. Hernandez does neither of those things.

So, MLB is going to step in and make Hernandez explain himself, yes?

 

There is no transparency or apparent accountability for umpires. This is totally unacceptable. It’s one area where the NFL gets things right and baseball simply doesn’t. It has to change.

MLBPA agrees to extend deadline for new posting agreement between MLB, NPB

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Update (7:00 PM ET): The MLBPA announces that the deadline has been extended 24 hours while MLB and NPB continue to negotiate a new agreement for the posting system. The new deadline is 8 PM ET on Tuesday.

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.