“We love you A-Rod”

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That’s what someone shouted from their car at Alex Rodriguez as he left the Yankees training complex yesterday as he finished his first day of baseball activities following hip surgery.

Kevin Kernan of the Post has a story about it. A-Rod says all the right things. It’s like the Yankees Department of Mystique and Aura wrote his script for him. He said it’s like “being 8 years old again.” He’s excited about the future, admits to feeling embarrassed about how last season ended and, while being cautious about his timetable for return, waxes positive and optimistic. If all of the things he said came out of Derek Jeter’s mouth no one would bat an eye.

This had to bug Kernan and the Post sports editors. Absolutely NOTHING in there with which to criticize Rodriguez. So he added this at the end:

With those words, Rodriguez got into his Maybach, a vehicle that sells for about $416,000, and was off — finally, his first day of baseball activities behind him.

I don’t ever recall reading about what car Jeter or Teixeira or Granderson or anyone else drove away in from the training facility, let alone how much it cost. The only reason for the car stuff and the misleading scene-setting is to signal to Post readers that A-Rod is rich and different in order to stoke some sort of “he’s an out-of-touch big shot” fires. That’s it.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.