Ryan Westmoreland is going back to school, hopes to return to field

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Former Red Sox prospect Ryan Westmoreland, who retired from baseball at age 22 this spring after a pair of brain surgeries, still hopes there’s some baseball in his future.

The native of Rhode Island sat down with the Newport Daily News to talk about his future recently:

“I’ve been working out a lot, and if the time comes, I’m going to give it a shot. Because retired or not, my dream has always been to play in the big leagues, and if it doesn’t happen, it doesn’t happen,” he said. “But if I ever feel like there’s a shot for me, I’m going to give it a shot. Whether it’s just playing catch or taking batting practice or whatever it is. I love the game still and that will never change.”

Westmoreland’s plan for now, though, calls for school and something that may allow him to work with young athletes someday.

“I’ve been looking into physical therapy school. It’s a six-year program, but I feel like I have a good understanding of the body and injuries — of course, injuries,” he said. “But it’s something I’ve always been interested in and I can branch off and do whatever — strength and conditioning, nutrition; that’s all kind of right up my alley.

Westmoreland’s schooling is already pretty much taken care of; his original contract with the Red Sox  guaranteed him $200,000 if he ended up going to college.

At age 19, Westmoreland hit .296/.401/.484 for short-season Single-A Lowell in 2009, quickly establishing himself as one of the game’s top outfield prospects. However, disaster struck the following spring, as he required surgery for a cavernous malformation in his brainstem. A second surgery followed in 2012, and he retired from baseball in March. He still has one more surgery planned, that to correct an eye problem that should allow him to ditch the glasses he’s currently wearing and permit him to drive again.

Report: Mets offer managerial position to Mickey Callaway

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The Mets have reportedly offered their managerial position to Indians’ pitching coach Mickey Callaway, according to multiple reports from the New York Post’s Joel Sherman and the Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal. The three-year deal was accepted and is expected to be finalized today, though the team has yet to make an official announcement.

Callaway, 42, got his start in coaching back in 2010 for the Indians’ Single-A affiliate, where he helped the Lake County Captains to their first Midwest League title. He was promoted to a coaching position in High-A in 2011 and finally advanced to a big league role in 2013, where he helped guide the Indians’ pitching staff through five winning seasons and three postseason runs. Their success serves as a ringing endorsement: they’ve consistently ranked among the top ten rotations in MLB and led the league with a collective 23.1 fWAR and second-best 3.52 ERA in 2017.

The timing couldn’t be better for the Mets, whose cadre of powerhouse pitchers has weathered numerous injuries to Noah Syndergaard (torn right lat muscle), Matt Harvey (stress reaction in right shoulder), Zack Wheeler (stress reaction in right arm) and Steven Matz (ulnar nerve irritation) over the last year. While they’re preparing to take on a manager with no prior managerial experience, it doesn’t look like that’ll be an issue for Callaway.