Ryan Westmoreland is going back to school, hopes to return to field

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Former Red Sox prospect Ryan Westmoreland, who retired from baseball at age 22 this spring after a pair of brain surgeries, still hopes there’s some baseball in his future.

The native of Rhode Island sat down with the Newport Daily News to talk about his future recently:

“I’ve been working out a lot, and if the time comes, I’m going to give it a shot. Because retired or not, my dream has always been to play in the big leagues, and if it doesn’t happen, it doesn’t happen,” he said. “But if I ever feel like there’s a shot for me, I’m going to give it a shot. Whether it’s just playing catch or taking batting practice or whatever it is. I love the game still and that will never change.”

Westmoreland’s plan for now, though, calls for school and something that may allow him to work with young athletes someday.

“I’ve been looking into physical therapy school. It’s a six-year program, but I feel like I have a good understanding of the body and injuries — of course, injuries,” he said. “But it’s something I’ve always been interested in and I can branch off and do whatever — strength and conditioning, nutrition; that’s all kind of right up my alley.

Westmoreland’s schooling is already pretty much taken care of; his original contract with the Red Sox  guaranteed him $200,000 if he ended up going to college.

At age 19, Westmoreland hit .296/.401/.484 for short-season Single-A Lowell in 2009, quickly establishing himself as one of the game’s top outfield prospects. However, disaster struck the following spring, as he required surgery for a cavernous malformation in his brainstem. A second surgery followed in 2012, and he retired from baseball in March. He still has one more surgery planned, that to correct an eye problem that should allow him to ditch the glasses he’s currently wearing and permit him to drive again.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.