Astros designate Rick Ankiel for assignment

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The Astros, sitting at 8-24 in last place in the AL West, have designated outfielder Rick Ankiel for assignment, tweets Houston Chronicle beat writer Brian T. Smith. It was one of a handful of moves the Astros made day, also designating Fernando Martinez for assignment, calling up Jimmy Paredes and Trevor Crowe, demoting Brandon Laird to Triple-A Oklahoma City, and activating J.D. Martinez from the disabled list.

Though Ankiel had five home runs and a .731 OPS in 65 trips to the plate, he was hitting .194 with a .231 on-base percentage, about as all or nothing as you can get at the Major League level. In late April, Cliff Corcoran of Sports Illustrated highlighted Ankiel’s “three true outcomes” approach:

In fact, it would be more accurate to describe Ankiel as a One True Outcome player. Yes, he has five home runs, but he has just one walk. Rather 28 of his 34 True Outcomes, a whopping 82 percent, have been strikeouts. Having struck out in his only two official at-bats on Thursday night, Ankiel has now struck out 28 times in 45 plate appearances, or 62 percent of the time he steps into the batter’s box. Not only would that be a record for strikeout percentage by a non-pitcher in a minimum of 45 plate appearances if the season (or Ankiel’s involvement in it) ended today, it means that Ankiel is striking out more often that Cust accomplished any of the Three True Outcomes in the most extreme TTO season in major league history.

Updating those figures as of today, Ankiel has the five home runs, three walks, and 35 strikeouts, representing 66 percent of his plate appearances. The Astros have been outscored by 75 runs in 32 games, so the decision to DFA Ankiel is quite understood.

It may be the 33-year-old’s last hurrah as he hasn’t shown any signs of improvement and teams have little use for a player who can’t get on base at least 30 percent of the time, particularly one that strikes out 12 times for every one walk.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: