Here’s an idea: “Total Baseball”

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No, not the old, now-defunct baseball stats and records book I used to so dearly love. But a proposed new scoring system for baseball created by Pat Cunningham of the Rockford Register-Star in Rockford, IL:

There’s nothing complicated about it: Every time a runner reaches a base — be it first, second, third or home — he scores a run. A single or walk with no one aboard counts for one run. A leadoff double counts for two runs. A single that moves a runner from first to third would count for three runs. And a grand-slam homer would count for 10 runs, not just four — and that doesn’t include the scores tallied by the players who were on base before the home run was hit.

Cunningham lays out a scenario where the home team is down four runs entering the botton of the ninth. Instead of a nearly certain loss, a single, a muffed double play and a hit-by-pitch brings them to within a single run! Anticipation! Drama! Excitement!

Silliness of course, and neither I nor Cunningham actually think anyone would adopt it.  But it would be great fun for beer league softball, pickup baseball games, assuming anyone still plays those, or college kids just messing around.

And heck, even if the majors did it, it’s not like the guys we think are the best now would suddenly be at a disadvantage. Just look at the all-time total base leaders. Awesome dudes, all.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.