By the way, the Red Sox still think the Blue Jays are cheaters, too

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While Dirk Hayhurst and Jack Morris have chimed in, none of this “Clay Buchholz is cheating” talk is coming from Blue Jays players or management. And it probably won’t. The Blue Jays don’t want to go accusing someone of cheating and then have their own dirty laundry aired.

The Red Sox, for instance, still seem to think the Blue Jays are stealing signs in Rogers Centre games. This was something that first came up a couple of years ago and eventually spurred an ESPN Outside the Lines investigation that found four players willing to say they’ve witnessed someone in the center-field stands relaying signs to hitters. Orioles starter Jason Hammel said last year that he thought something shady was going on.

Of course, the 2013 Red Sox, more than any other team in baseball, know exactly what was going on with the Blue Jays in 2011-12, given that they now employ Toronto’s former manager, John Farrell, and third-base coach, Brian Butterfield. And while those two haven’t spoken up about anything like sign stealing, they’ve continued to employ the method the Red Sox first used in 2011 of having the catcher give multiple signs to the pitcher with no one on base. It’s something they’d have absolutely no reason to do unless they thought someone in the field of view — such as behind the center-field wall — was watching.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

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Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”