So much for that: Chase Headley won’t negotiate with the Padres during the season

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OK, now this is just awkward.

Padres executive chairman Ron Fowler said yesterday that he’s given general manager Josh Byrnes the go-ahead to re-start long-term contract negotiations with Chase Headley and is willing to make the third baseman “the highest-paid player in club history.”

It was a whole big story in San Diego today, with lots of quotes from Fowler and lots of speculation about the size of the contract. One problem? Headley has no interest in talking contract during the season.

Here’s what he told Corey Brock of MLB.com today:

We made it abundantly clear [before] that we didn’t want to talk about it during the season I didn’t think that for me and for the team that it was good to get caught up with all of this during the season. … It’s flattering they feel the way they feel about me. I love playing in San Diego, I love the fans. But I just don’t think now is the time to get involved with this. That’s it. If there’s an opportunity to engage after the season, so be it. I didn’t want to have to deal with the fallout I’m dealing with.

Headley is under team control via arbitration next season as well, but at that point he’ll be making over $10 million and will be just 162 games from hitting the open market as a free agent.

It’s like that old saying about relationships goes: “You can’t want it bad enough for both of us.” (I have no idea if that’s actually an old saying, but I vaguely remember hearing something along those lines once and it sort of applies here pretty well.)

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.