So much for that: Chase Headley won’t negotiate with the Padres during the season

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OK, now this is just awkward.

Padres executive chairman Ron Fowler said yesterday that he’s given general manager Josh Byrnes the go-ahead to re-start long-term contract negotiations with Chase Headley and is willing to make the third baseman “the highest-paid player in club history.”

It was a whole big story in San Diego today, with lots of quotes from Fowler and lots of speculation about the size of the contract. One problem? Headley has no interest in talking contract during the season.

Here’s what he told Corey Brock of MLB.com today:

We made it abundantly clear [before] that we didn’t want to talk about it during the season I didn’t think that for me and for the team that it was good to get caught up with all of this during the season. … It’s flattering they feel the way they feel about me. I love playing in San Diego, I love the fans. But I just don’t think now is the time to get involved with this. That’s it. If there’s an opportunity to engage after the season, so be it. I didn’t want to have to deal with the fallout I’m dealing with.

Headley is under team control via arbitration next season as well, but at that point he’ll be making over $10 million and will be just 162 games from hitting the open market as a free agent.

It’s like that old saying about relationships goes: “You can’t want it bad enough for both of us.” (I have no idea if that’s actually an old saying, but I vaguely remember hearing something along those lines once and it sort of applies here pretty well.)

Former Yankees prospect Manny Banuelos signs a minor league deal with the Dodgers

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Remember Manny Banuelos? He was once a top pitching prospect for the Yankees and then, apparently disappeared from the face of the earth. Or at least it felt like it. Now he’s in the news, however, as the Dodgers have signed him to a minor league contract.

OK, Banuelos didn’t disappear. He was traded to the Braves in 2015, had a cup of coffee with them, pitching pretty ineffectively in seven big league games, was released by Atlanta in the middle of 2016 and then latched on with the Angels. This past season he posted a 4.93 ERA over 95 innings while being used mostly as a reliever at Triple-A Salt Lake.

Banuelos pitched in the Future’s Game in 2009 and was a star in the Arizona Fall League in 2010. He was a top-50 prospect heading into 2011 before falling to Tommy John surgery in 2012. With Atlanta he suffered some bone spur problems and then some elbow issues that never resulted in surgery but which never subsided enough for him to fulfill his potential either. He suffered injuries. A lot of pitchers do.

It’s unrealistic to think that Banuelos will fulfill the promise he had six years ago, but he’s worth a minor league deal to see if the 26-year-old can at least be a serviceable reliever.