Posnanski: let’s get rid of the baseball playoffs

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He knows it’s not gonna happen. But he makes a damn fine point:

In England, soccer mirrors life. It’s the day-to-day excellence that marks greatness, not a three or four-week run to glory.

Well, I think we should bring some of that spirit to America … especially to baseball. I mean football is geared for the short season – 16 games, an intense playoffs, a Super Bowl, that’s why it’s the biggest thing in America. But they play 162 games in baseball. One hundred sixty two. I mean, seriously, that’s a lot of baseball games. No other sport plays so many.

That’s more than enough game to determine who are the best teams in baseball.

I feel that way. And not just because I root for a team that was quite often one of the best after 162 games yet only had one October Tournament win to show for it.

I love the World Series and all of the October drama, but I feel like it’s a completely separate season than the 162-game thing. The dynamic and rhythms of the whole exercise changes when the playoffs start. As do the strategies, the scheduling, the weather and just about everything that matters. I know the World Series crowns baseball’s champ, but I have always felt like the regular season tells you which baseball team is actually the best.

I’d be sad if the World Series were gone. But I’d get over it too.

UPDATE:  Kay and I talked about this in a special HBT Extra today too:

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Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.