The Blue Jays had a players-only meeting to deal with the “bad vibes”

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Bill Madden of the Daily News reports that the Blue Jays, off to an awful start, held a players-only, closed-door meeting yesterday

DeRosa would later call a players-only meeting to reiterate a lot of what beleaguered Blue Jay manager John Gibbons said to the media the day before … “There’s just a bad vibe creeping in here and we need to address it,” DeRosa said. “It’s just weird after spring training when we had a swagger about us.”

Maybe coming in to the season with “swagger” before you accomplished anything has something to do with the problems. Who knows!

In other news, Andy Martino catches up with R.A. Dickey who has a lot to say about the weird fascination the Mets and some of their fans still seem to have with him. He’s out the door and long gone, but for some reason he’s still a divisive figure in Queens. This is what happens to baseball players when they have the gall to have opinions about things I suppose.

One opinion Dickey shared with Martino is questionable, however:

“It has obviously been incredibly disappointing for everybody,” Dickey said.  “The beauty of baseball is that it’s just one month and we’ve got five left. So there’s still time.

Go ask Jay Jaffe about that. He looks at teams who have started as poorly as the Jays have in the wild card era. And the results are something less than encouraging.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”