Neil Walker receives six stitches in finger after slide into second base

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The Pirates could be without their starting second baseman for a little while. According to Tom Singer of MLB.com, Neil Walker required six stitches in the knuckle of his right index finger last night after he attempted to break up a double play and had his hand stepped on by Cardinals’ shortstop Pete Kozma. You can watch the play here.

Walker said it will likely be six or seven days for before the stitches are removed, though there’s a chance it could be longer before he’s completely comfortable with baseball activities. It’s not clear if the Pirates will make a roster move or go short-handed over the next several days.

“It was very, very deep — the deepest cut I’ve ever had for stitches,” said Walker, wearing a bandage around his right hand with blood stains on his uniform pants after the game. “I’m not excited that it happened, but I do feel fortunate that there was no damage to tendons or bone or issues like that.

Walker, 27, is hitting .253 (20-for-79) with one home run, eight RBI and a .693 OPS through 23 games this season. Brandon Inge is expected to fill in at second base for now.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.