Was Jackie Robinson as feared a base runner as everyone thinks?

33 Comments

Rob Neyer wrote a whole book once fact-checking and, in many cases, debunking long-told tales of Major League Baseball. You really should own it, even if you don’t care much about the particular baseball legends he debunks.  The process of doing it — of taking on baseball’s exceptionally weighty folklore — is worth it in its own right. Some may say part of baseball’s charm is that it lends itself to myth-making and tale-telling, but it’s also the reason why there is so much damn misinformation and misunderstanding floating around.

Today Rob takes a look at “42” and at Jackie Robinson in general and asks whether the facts on the ground about Robinson’s base running match his reputation as a speedy, disruptive terror on the base paths. Short answer: nope. Not particularly.

Go read it to see why that it is.  And why — and this one may ruffle more feathers than merely taking on Robinson’s base running might — go see why Neyer thinks it’s entirely possible that Robinson — purely on the baseball merits — may not have been the most deserving candidate for Rookie of the Year in 1947.

Taking on stuff like this doesn’t make Rob too many friends. That would bother me if I thought he cared all that much about such things. But regardless of how that all breaks out, stuff like this is among my favorite kind of baseball writing.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
2 Comments

Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.