Scientists create a baseball-playing robot

60 Comments

But Mike Trout already exists!

Jokes aside, this is a very interesting article from Wired. Researchers at the University of Electro-Communications in Tokyo and the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology have created a robot that adapts to pitches using software which mimics the function of the human brain’s 100,000 neurons.

When a ball is pitched to the robot, an accelerometer at the back of a batting cage records information about the flight of the ball, including its speed, and this data is relayed back to a machine that holds the GPU-powered brain. The brain then crunches this data so that it can determine exactly when the robot should swing. If the scientists change the pitch speed, the robot will relearn the task all over again.

The robot already has better plate discipline than Delmon Young.

I, for one, welcome our baseball-playing robot overlords.

Report: Glen Perkins will retire from baseball

Stephen Dunn/Getty Images
4 Comments

According to MLB.com’s Rhett Bollinger, Twins GM Thad Levine told 1390 Granite City Sports that reliever Glen Perkins will retire.

Perkins, 34, has battled shoulder injuries over the last two years, limiting him to a total of 7 2/3 innings between 2016-17. His decision doesn’t come as much of a surprise given the circumstances. The Twins declined his $6.5 million club option back in October, making him a free agent.

Across parts of 12 seasons, all with the Twins, Perkins compiled a 3.88 ERA with 120 saves and a 504/158 K/BB ratio in 624 1/3 innings. He ranked among baseball’s best closers from 2013-15, racking up 102 of those saves with a 3.08 ERA. The lefty made the American League All-Star team in each of those three seasons.