Brian McCann begins rehab, at least two weeks from return

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UPDATE: So much for McCann potentially coming off the disabled list early next week, as manager Fredi Gonzalez told Mark Bowman of MLB.com that the plan is for his minor-league rehab stint to last at least 10 games.

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Brian McCann had to put his rehab from shoulder surgery on hold because of a wrist injury, but David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal Constitution reports that the Braves catcher is feeling good enough to begin a minor-league rehab assignment tonight.

McCann will be in the lineup for high Single-A Rome and it sounds like the plan is for him to play there all weekend before potentially coming off the disabled list as soon as Monday.

McCann and the Braves have been targeting May 1 as a return date, which would be Wednesday, so it’s possible they’ll ask the catcher to put in a little more time in the minors. McCann hit just .219 with a .653 OPS in the second half last season while playing through the shoulder pain, finishing with a career-worst .698 OPS after four straight seasons above .800.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.